#CycleON - Ontario's Cycling Strategy

cycleon-strategy - cover page

Foreword

Cycling has become a popular activity in Ontario, both for recreation and daily transportation.

Recent Ministry of Transportation surveys of road users suggest that around 1.2 million adults in Ontario ride a bicycle daily during the spring, summer and fall, and 2.8 million ride at least once a week. These high level statistics don't tell the full story - there are many communities in Ontario where few people cycle.

Cycling generates a wide range of health, economic, environmental, social and other benefits. These include improved personal health, reduced health care costs as a result of lower rates of chronic conditions through active living, reduced traffic congestion in urban areas, a cleaner environment and increased tourism opportunities across the province.

A new strategy to increase cycling in Ontario

#CycleON: Ontario's Cycling Strategy looks ahead 20 years and asks what needs to be done to help more people and communities in Ontario reap the benefits of cycling. It is designed to encourage the growth of cycling and improve the safety of people who cycle across the province.

At the heart of the Strategy are a bold Vision, ambitious Goals and a set of carefully targeted Strategic Directions. These will guide the development of policies, programs and legislation over the next 20 years. Achieving the Strategy's Vision requires a commitment from all partners for integrated action to:

  • Design healthy, active and prosperous communities
  • Improve cycling infrastructure
  • Make highways and streets safer
  • Promote cycling awareness and behavioural shifts
  • Increase cycling tourism in Ontario.

Cycling is an activity that is affected by the actions of many organizations, including different levels of government, cycling and transportation associations, safety organizations, businesses and health units. The Ontario Government wants to work with all groups with an interest in cycling to bring to life the Vision of this Strategy.

Ideas drawn from across the province

To develop the best Strategy possible, we asked the public and cycling stakeholders for comments, suggestions and ideas that should be considered.

The response levels were extraordinarily high. We received more than 1,000 written submissions, most of them from private individuals, in response to an early draft of the Cycling Strategy released for public consultation in November 2012.

Page 4: Queen's Printer for Ontario

We also brought together, for a one day specially convened workshop, representatives from 24 organizations - municipalities, cycling organizations, motor vehicle associations, public health units, the Ontario Provincial Police, infrastructure experts and cycling advocates - to get their input.

The need to improve cycling infrastructure, safety and road user education were among the top areas of concern.

In addition, the Office of the Chief Coroner for Ontario released in June 2012 a review of all accidental cycling deaths in Ontario from 2006 to 2010.1 The review recommended, among other actions, that the Ministry of Transportation (MTO) should develop a new cycling strategy for Ontario.

Where do we go from here?

#CycleON: Ontario's Cycling Strategy will be implemented through ongoing, multi-year Action Plans. The Strategy provides a route to achieve our 20-year Vision, and the Action Plans will identify a step-by-step process to accomplish our Goals. All of the comments, suggestions and ideas received have shaped the Vision, Goals and Strategic Directions contained in #CycleON. The list of potential initiatives generated through the consultation exercises will help shape future Action Plans.

These Action Plans, which will also be developed in consultation with our partners, will translate the Goals and Strategic Directions of the Strategy into specific projects and initiatives. Each Action Plan will include specific performance metrics and indicators, report on progress to date, discuss new issues and emerging trends, and identify projects and the partnerships that will be needed to achieve results.

The government is committed to increasing the number and safety of people who cycle in the province. But we can't do it alone. The strength of this Strategy is that it is powered by partnerships and collaboration. We need the support of municipalities, the broader public, road users, businesses and non-governmental organizations.

We are looking forward to collaborating with and supporting the work of all stakeholders to create an Ontario where cycling is widely accepted and valued by people of all ages as a normal, safe, convenient and daily mode of transportation.

Page 5: City of Toronto

Summary of Ontario's Cycling Strategy

Vision 2033

Cycling in Ontario is recognized, respected, and valued as a core mode of transportation that provides individuals and communities with health, economic, environmental, social and other benefits.

Guiding Priciples

Safety + Accessibility and Connectivity + Partnership

Aspirational Goals for 2033

  1. Ontario is recognized as the best Canadian province for cycling and ranked among the top 10 jurisdictions worldwide for cycling. At least one Ontario city is ranked among the 10 most bike-friendly cities in the world.
  2. The built environment in most Ontario communities supports and promotes cycling for all trips under 5 km.
  3. Ontario's cycling environment is safe for people of all ages, striving to achieve a record of zero fatalities and few serious injuries.
  4. Ontario's cities and towns will have interconnected networks of safe cycling routes enabling people to cycle to work, school, home and key destinations.
  5. Ontario has an integrated province-wide network of cycling routes.

Strategic Directions

Healthy, Active and Prosperous Communities

  • Enhance cycling provisions when planning policies, guidelines and legislation are reviewed
  • Partner with municipalities to implement Complete Streets policies and develop cycling or active transportation plans as applicable
  • Partner with municipalities and transit agencies to integrate cycling with transit
  • Ensure that bicycles are better accommodated in institutional, residential and commercial buildings

Cycling Infrastructure

  • Develop a funding partnership with municipalities and the federal government to build provincial and municipal cycling routes
  • Make adherence to design guidelines conditional to receiving funding
  • Fund provincial and municipal cycling infrastructure pilot projects to test new ideas and gather data
  • Remove barriers and streamline approval processes to implement cycling infrastructure

Safer Highways and Streets

  • Review and recommend cycling-related legislation based on the latest research
  • Continue to better educate all road users on the rules of the road and build cycling skills
  • Work with police services to build consistency of enforcement of existing traffic laws to improve cycling safety

Awareness and Behavioural Shift

  • Lead province-wide campaigns to encourage more people to cycle more often
  • Develop and share relevant cycling best practices, research and data
  • Encourage more cycling education in schools and at the community level

Cycling Tourism

  • Promote Ontario as a premier cycling tourism destination
  • Identify a province-wide cycling network and use it to prioritize future infrastructure investments on provincial highways
  • Improve cycling tourism experiences in Ontario and inter-modal cycling connections by working with our partners to provide end-of-trip facilities, maps of existing cycling routes and way-finding applications

Future Action Plans

The Need for Action: Cycling's Province-wide Benefits

Riding a bike is a simple pleasure. It appeals to people of all ages and abilities, from all backgrounds. For the individual who cycles, it's an activity that can generate health benefits and cut transportation costs.

But multiply the individual benefits of cycling by millions and the personal, social, environmental and economic impacts are huge.

Research from around the world suggests that encouraging more people to cycle more often generates multiple benefits. In fact, increasing the growth of cycling as a mode of day-to-day travel as well as a means of recreation could help us address some of the most pressing issues facing Ontario today.

A wealth of benefits

If we were to increase the number of trips people made by bike, how would we benefit?

Improved personal and public health

Cycling keeps you active. A lack of physical activity is a significant risk factor in cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer, hypertension, bone and joint disease and depression.2 Cycling burns more calories than sitting in a car, which is one of the reasons why the Ontario Medical Association recommends incorporating cycling into our daily lives.3 Many people could meet the physician-suggested levels of physical activity simply by commuting to work by bike, for example.

Increasing cycling would have cumulative societal benefits. According to the Canadian Medical Association, "a 10 per cent increase in physical activity could reduce direct health-care expenditures by $150 million a year. This does not include indirect costs such as lost productivity due to illness, premature death or a range of other factors, including mental illness and poor quality of life." 4

Page 8: Queen's Printer for Ontario

19,780 The average number of people who cycle to work every day in Toronto. 13

Cycling can also help improve mental health. Stress management and a healthy work-life balance are important factors in maintaining mental well-being. According to Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, engaging in physical activities like cycling can help people cope with stress, build their self-confidence and form supportive friendships.

Cleaner environment

One litre of gasoline emits about 2.3 kg of carbon dioxide (CO2) when burned.5 CO2 is a greenhouse gas (GHG) and the main contributor to climate change. On average, transportation accounts for around one third of Ontario's total GHG emissions.6

Cycling does not produce any significant GHG emissions or other air pollutants. More people choosing to cycle would mean fewer emissions.

A study by Toronto Public Health found that air pollution associated with traffic contributes to about 440 premature deaths and 1,700 hospitalizations per year in the City of Toronto alone.7 Reducing air pollution by replacing motor vehicle trips with cycling trips could help decrease the number of premature deaths and hospitalizations.

Dollars and cents

Cycling tourism is booming. In 2010, two million Canadian visitors went cycling while travelling in Ontario and spent $391 million, which was an 18 per cent increase in spending over the previous year.8 One bed & breakfast operator in the Niagara Region reported that cyclists represent 50 per cent of their guests, a huge increase over the previous decade.9

Cycling tourism holds tremendous growth potential for both rural and urban areas of Ontario. There are hundreds of municipal and regional cycling routes across the province. Connecting them into a provincewide system would create more tourism opportunities.

Local businesses also benefit from day-to-day spending by Ontarians who cycle. In urban areas, cyclists and pedestrians spend more money with local businesses than motorists who visit the neighbourhood, according a study by the Clean Air Partnership.10

Ontario's Cycling Potential

The Ministry of Transportation's 2013 Road Safety Marketing Attitude and Behaviour Survey suggests that around 1.2 million adults in Ontario ride a bicycle daily during the spring, summer and fall, and 2.8 million ride at least once a week

Despite these encouraging province-wide cycling numbers, statistics on the number of commuters in individual cities and towns suggest big differences across the province. They also highlight how much potential there is to increase cycling as a mode of transportation.

In smaller towns, cycling can often account for a higher percentage of trips taken due to the short distance between destinations. For example, in Espanola about 5 per cent of all commutes are made by bike, whereas in the City of Toronto the figure is around 1.7 per cent.11

Statistics suggest there is significant potential in Ontario to increase the number of people who regularly ride their bikes to work or school. One out of every three people has a daily, one way commute of less than five kilometres,12 a distance that an average adult can cycle in 30 minutes or less. One of our Aspirational Goals is that the built environment in most Ontario communities supports and promotes cycling for all trips under five kilometres.

While cycling is not an option for everyone - it is not always practical or convenient, and some individuals have mobility challenges - we can all benefit by making it a more viable transportation option for more people in Ontario.

Page 9: Share the Road Cycling Coalition.

Case Story

Reaching for Excellence

A community that includes the best of the best

Ontario's bike community is broad, diverse and growing. It includes about 500 retail bike stores14 plus equipment manufacturers, tourism operators, and cycling visitors from around the world. The heart of this community is the millions of people who ride bikes in Ontario. They range from people who occasionally ride around the neighbourhood to world-class elite athletes - a group that is well known to Torontobased Cervélo Cycles.

Cervélo Cycles was founded in 1995 by two engineers, Phil White and Gérard Vroomen. Their passion was to develop better high-performance, time-trial bikes. Did they succeed? At the 2008 Beijing Olympics, more than 40 athletes competed on Cervélo bikes, garnering 10 Olympic medals - three Gold, five Silver and two Bronze. That same year, Carlos Sastre won the Tour de France riding a Cervélo bike.

Just like the founders of Cervélo Cycles, we have the potential to become cycling leaders. Realizing that vision would change the lives of people in Ontario for generations to come.


Case Story

Charity cycling events

Pedal-powering to build better lives for all Canadians

One sure sign of the growing popularity of cycling in Ontario is the increase in charity cycling events. They range in size from neighbourhood tours to two-day rides, such as the Gear Up to End MS tour from Grand Bend to London. In 2013, the biggest of all - the Becel Heart & Stroke Ride for Heart - brought together 13,000 cyclists who rode the streets and car-free expressways of downtown Toronto to raise $5.5 million to support world-class research and heart-health promotion. For many, these become annual events that combine having fun with providing worthwhile opportunities to give something back to their community

Ontario's 20 Year Cycling Vision, Principles and Goals

Vision 2033: Creating a more bike-friendly Ontario

Increasing the number of cyclists in Ontario holds the potential for tremendous, broad, long-term benefits. But there are challenges.

For Ontario to reap the rewards of increased cycling, we need to increase understanding and awareness of cycling through education and outreach programs. We need to include more cycling infrastructure within our communities. We need to create a safer cycling environment to encourage more people to ride their bikes more often. We need to better connect the cycling routes within Ontario to create more cycling tourism opportunities.

It's a big task that will take time. It will involve many partners: provincial ministries and agencies, municipalities across Ontario, road-user groups, businesses, non-governmental organizations and private individuals.

MTO will play a central role in the process. MTO will champion the acceptance and adoption of cycling as a highly valued mode of transportation and will review and recommend updates to cycling-related policies, practices, design guidelines and legislation based on the latest research. The Ontario Government will support the work of our partners to jointly create a safer, more convenient cycling system across the province.


Vision 2033

To help shape our collaborations and partnerships, we offer a long-term vision of what we could achieve by working together. It provides a picture of an Ontario 20 years into the future in which cycling is broadly accepted as a normal part of daily life.

Cycling in Ontario is recognized, respected and valued as a core mode of transportation that provides individuals and communities with health, economic, environmental, social and other benefits.

Guiding Principles

A set of basic principles guide the development of strategies that will enable us to achieve the Vision. They are grounded in shared values consistent with public policy and program development initiatives undertaken by all levels of government across the province.

Safety

The safety of all road users, including cyclists, is paramount.

Partnership

Partnerships and collaborations among all stakeholders - cyclists, governments at all levels, industry and researchers - are essential to increasing the cycling mode share in Ontario..

Accessibility and Connectivity

Cycling in Ontario is accessible for people of all ages and abilities. Networks are interconnected and integrated with other modes of transportation.

Aspirational Goals for 2033

Goals provide valuable targets by which we can measure our progress, refine our priorities and assess new opportunities. By choosing bold Aspirational Goals, we are envisioning an Ontario where cycling opportunities are among the best in the world.

  1. Ontario is recognized as the best Canadian province for cycling and ranked among the top 10 jurisdictions worldwide for cycling. At least one Ontario city is ranked among the 10 most bike-friendly cities in the world.
  2. The built environment in most Ontario communities supports and promotes cycling for all trips under 5 km.
  3. Ontario's cycling environment is safe for people of all ages, striving to achieve a record of zero fatalities and few serious injuries.
  4. Ontario's cities and towns have interconnected networks of safe cycling routes enabling people to cycle to work, school, home and key destinations.
  5. Ontario has an integrated, province-wide network of cycling routes.
Page 11: The Town of Fort Erie

Strategic Directions

One person riding a bike is a simple activity. Making it safe and convenient for millions of people to cycle daily is a more complex task. Accomplishing our goals means moving forward in a coordinated way on a number of different fronts. To increase the number and safety of cyclists in Ontario, we propose to:

1. Design healthy, active and prosperous communities

The design of Ontario communities has evolved since the post-war period. The focus today is on creating communities that mix residential and business activities in an environment that supports active transportation. The goal is to build active, liveable communities in which more of our goods, services and jobs are available within an easy bike ride from home. A more cycling-friendly approach to land-use and transportation planning is key to creating healthy communities.

2. Improve cycling infrastructure

Increasing cycling as a daily activity will require more bike paths, cycling routes and cycling-friendly transit connections. As we build that infrastructure, we need to consider new design guidelines that will benefit all road users. We can also explore opportunities for innovative funding and development models that could help support this growth.

3. Make highways and streets safer

We can reduce cycling road fatalities and injuries by continuing to ensure our traffic laws and policies are based on the latest research and reflect the differences between bicycles and motor vehicles. Enforcing the rules of the road, improving cycling skills and increasing road-user education also contribute to safer highways and streets.

4. Promote awareness and behavioural shifts

Encouraging more people to ride their bikes means communicating the benefits of cycling, sharing cyclingrelated data and research, and demonstrating leadership on cycling issues.

5. Increase cycling tourism opportunities

Ontario's cycling tourism industry is growing and creating new economic opportunities for communities. On-road and off-road cycling paths abound in the province. Connecting them into a province-wide network holds significant potential to boost cycling tourism.

Strategic Directions

1. Design Healthy, Active and Prosperous Communities

Many communities across Ontario are grappling with how to plan for changes over the next 20 years.

Major issues include population growth, demographic shifts, industrial changes, urbanization, congestion, environmental sustainability and rising health-care costs.

Addressing these challenges is often made more costly and complex by the way communities were designed during the past 60 years.

Post-war planning and development tended to segregate different land uses into single-use districts, such as strictly residential neighbourhoods with no businesses, or all-commercial districts with no residential developments. This increased the distances between the places people needed to go on a daily basis, reducing the viability of cycling as a mode of transportation.

Post-war road design - wide, straight, high-speed arterial roadways combined with curving, disconnected cul-de-sacs and crescents between them - reduced the viability of cycling because getting around on a bicycle would often involve riding on a busy, main road.

The personal health-related impacts of relying heavily on motor vehicles for daily transportation include a tendency toward physical inactivity, which can lead to chronic health conditions and increased air pollution.

In short, designing more cycling-friendly communities offers a wealth of benefits.

Planning and designing healthy, active communities

The good news is that our approach to planning is changing. For well over a decade, the province and many municipalities have been embracing and promoting the concepts of healthy, active communities and Complete Streets as key planning and design approaches to increase cycling.

Page 13: Goh Iromoto/Waterfront Regeneration Trust

What are healthy, active communities? They are communities that provide opportunities for people to lead a physically active and socially engaged life, which creates health benefits and allows people to grow older more easily within their communities. These are communities where it is easy for people to travel to work, do their shopping, go to school or visit friends using active transportation. Active transportation is human-powered and includes walking, cycling, using a wheelchair, in-line skating and more.

Page 14: Queen's Printer for Ontario, photo source: Ontario Growth Secretariat, Ministry of Infrastructure

From a land-use and transportation planning perspective, healthy, active communities are generally more compact, have a greater mix and integration of land uses, are more locally self-sustaining, and have the transportation infrastructure needed to support walking and cycling as well as driving.

Healthy, active communities meet people's needs for daily living throughout an entire lifetime by providing convenient access to jobs, local services, a full range of housing and community infrastructure including affordable housing, schools, recreation and open spaces. These communities also provide convenient access to public transportation and options for safe, nonmotorized travel.

Ideally, in a healthy and active community, active transportation should be possible and promoted for trips of 5 km or less to work, home or school. To make this feasible and accepted, routes need to be safe and convenient for users of all ages and abilities. They also need to be connected with public transit and other transportation modes, as well as major destinations and activity centres.

Page 15: www.pedbikeimages.org/ Laura Sandt

528 people per million

The estimated number of premature deaths averted, associated with an increase in physical activity, in London, England in 2030, if walking doubled and cycling increased eight-fold. 15

Complete Streets are roads and adjacent public spaces that are designed for people of all ages, abilities and modes of travel. That is, Complete Streets are designed for all road users. Within Complete Streets, safe and comfortable access for all pedestrians, cyclists, transit users is not an afterthought, but an integral planning feature. Planning and designing Complete Streets also includes the consideration of the built form along roads - both the type/ mix of uses and the design of the buildings - as well as the relationship between built form and public spaces. For cycling, this could include various forms of bike lanes, traffic calming elements, parking facilities and a pleasant environment with trees, etc.

This is not a cookie-cutter approach to street design. Different streets require different balances of transportation infrastructure, responding to current and future needs of road users of all ages and abilities. It involves integrating a wide range of transportation options and traffic management tools to support quality of life, economic, and environmental sustainability.

Several Ontario communities, including Ajax, Ottawa, Toronto and Waterloo, for example, are exploring and/or incorporating Complete Streets design principles into current projects.

Building on progress to date

Cycling is playing an increasing role in Ontario's transportation planning process.

Cycling is one of the modes of transportation influenced by the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing's Provincial Policy Statement (PPS), which gives direction about land-use planning for the entire province. The PPS sets a vision for promoting the design of healthy, active communities by planning public streets, spaces and facilities that are safe and encourage walking and cycling. Different sections of the PPS provide specific guidance on cycling infrastructure, as do related regionally-focused plans such as the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe.

All Ontario municipalities prepare official plans to guide their growth and development over the long-term. Municipal official plans are the primary vehicle for implementing provincial policy, such as the PPS, and matters of local concern.

Once an official plan is adopted by the local council, it must be approved by the upper-tier municipality or province, as appropriate. Thereafter, planning-related decisions must conform to the official plan. Increasingly, municipalities have been incorporating policies and approaches to implement the concepts of healthy, active communities and Complete Streets into their official plans. In addition, more municipalities are developing transportation and/or cycling master plans as part of their guiding policy framework and to lay out implementation strategies.

Partnerships in planning active transportation networks

Designing and building active transportation networks in Ontario is a responsibility shared by the provincial government and municipalities. Partnerships, collaboration and coordination are key to successful projects.

To help municipalities develop the best local approaches to increasing healthy, active transportation opportunities within their communities, the province has also developed technical design guidelines. MTO provides Transit-Supportive Guidelines to share strategies, best practices and case studies on building communities that support public transit and the integration of transit with cycling and walking.

Areas for Action

To support the development of cycling-friendly communities, the province will:

  • Enhance cycling provisions when planning policies, guidelines and legislation are reviewed
  • Partner with municipalities to implement Complete Streets policies and develop cycling or active transportation plans as applicable
  • Partner with municipalities and transit agencies to integrate cycling with transit
  • Ensure that bicycles are better accommodated in institutional, residential and commercial buildings

Each of these key areas for action will be supported by specific projects, programs and initiatives identified in future Action Plans.


Page 18: Queen's Printer for Ontario, photo source: Ontario Growth Secretariat, Ministry of Infrastructure

Page 16: City of Waterloo

Case Story

A Complete Street project in Ontario

Waterloo transforms four-lane arterial road

During the 1970s, Davenport Road, in the City of Waterloo, was built as a four-lane collector road linking residential neighbourhoods to the arterial road network and a major shopping centre. Following complaints by area residents, the city commissioned a traffic study in 2006 that confirmed that speeds and numbers of collisions on the road were elevated. The study also found that the road's capacity was more than twice the

volume of its traffic. Between 2010 and 2012, the city reconstructed Davenport Road as a two-lane road with bike lanes and a variety of improvements for pedestrians and transit users. The street has clearly been enhanced visually, and early indications show that many of the project objectives - such as a reduction in speeds and collisions and an increase in the number of cyclists and pedestrians - have been met.


Page 17: Queen's Printer for Ontario, photo source: Ontario Growth Secretariat, Ministry of Infrastructure

Case Story

Complete Streets policies in the U.S.

U.S. local and state governments adopt new approach to street design

Many U.S. state governments and hundreds of local ones have adopted Complete Streets policies.

For example, the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) adopted a Complete Streets policy in 2009. The policy includes a commitment

to provide "an efficient multi-modal transportation network - such that the access, mobility and safety needs of motorists, transit users, bicyclists and pedestrians of all ages and abilities are safely accommodated."16 Exceptions to the policy are allowed, particularly in rural areas.

To support the implementation of the policy, NCDOT developed Complete Streets Planning and Design Guidelines. It is also offering training courses to provide detailed technical information about implementing the concepts introduced in the Complete Streets guidelines.

2. Improve Cycling Infrastructure

Encouraging the growth of cycling means rethinking how we specify, design and build transportation infrastructure.

It means looking at roads as public spaces that need to be safe and efficient for users of all ages and abilities. It means doing things differently.

Infrastructure should support increased cycling as a convenient method of daily transportation, not just cycling as physical activity for health or recreation. This involves identifying and responding to local needs. It could include, for example, removing structural barriers to cycling by building a bridge over a busy highway connecting two cycling routes.

Another critically important aspect is making inter-modal connections, such as those between cycling and transit, easy, efficient and convenient. End-of-trip facilities (e.g. bike parking at a GO train station) and last-mile strategies (e.g. bike sharing) enable commuters to cycle from transit hubs to their final destinations. New concepts in community-based cycling are being developed and tested around the world. They can provide us with data and best practices to help us develop cycling solutions that are best suited to our needs.

Page 19: City of Toronto

Cycling infrastructure underway

The shift in transportation planning to include more cycling infrastructure is already underway in Ontario.

The Big Move, Metrolinx's 25-year regional transportation plan for the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA), sets out a vision for a sustainable, multi-modal transportation system across the GTHA.

Page 20: Concept rendering produced by the Rt. Hon. Herb Gray Parkway project team

78% The percentage of Ontarians who believe that more people would cycle if there was better cycling infrastructure. 19

The Big Move outlines active transportation targets and recommends measures to promote the development of communities that are pedestrian-, cycling- and transitsupportive. It calls for an integrated walking and cycling network in the GTHA, the creation of pilot bike-sharing programs in major urban centres, the inclusion of bicycle-carrying devices on transit vehicles and the establishment of bicycle-storage facilities at major rapid transit stations.

The Big Move also imagines a future in which key transit stations become mobility hubs, where transportation modes, including rapid transit, local transit, specialized transit, cycling and accessible pedestrian networks, come together seamlessly. In 2011, Metrolinx published guidelines for the planning and development of mobility hubs that address the seamless integration of the modes at rapid transit stations.

BikeLinx was a $5 million Metrolinx initiative that made it easier for people in the GTHA to combine bicycling with transit. Through the BikeLinx program, Metrolinx provided funding to GTHA municipalities to equip every bus in their transit fleets with an external bike rack and to install permanent, secure and sheltered bicycle parking facilities at major transit stops.

Municipalities across Ontario are also moving forward with their own plans to improve local cycling infrastructure. Of critical importance is identifying best practices in the design and maintenance of bike facilities. MTO is working with municipalities, engineering and planning consultants and tourism organizations through the Ontario Traffic Council to help fill that gap through the Ontario Traffic Manual Book 18: Bicycling Facilities (OTM Book 18).

Currently OTM Book 18 is in the final stages of development and is expected to be released by the end of 2013. OTM Book 18 contains guidelines for cycling facilities for Ontario municipalities. It provides practical guidance on the type of cycling facility to construct given the local context (i.e. traffic volume and speed) and details on how to design and operate the facility, based on current best practices in Ontario, Canada and internationally. Facilities that are not currently in wide-use in Ontario, such as buffered bike lanes, cycle tracks (raised) and two-stage left turn boxes, are included. OTM Book 18 will help road authorities create high-quality cycling facilities and promote a consistent, predictable roadway environment, encouraging safe behaviour among all road users.

MTO is also updating the Bikeways Design Manual, which provides direction for the design of cycling facilities on provincial highways.

In addition, MTO is piloting the effect of paving part of the highway shoulder as a way to increase the safety of all road users. Monitoring the usage of these facilities will feed into the process of designing highways that are safer for cyclists and that could, among other benefits, help connect regional cycling routes into a broader network.

A number of municipalities have taken action to build more cycling infrastructure. For example, in July 2011, Ottawa introduced segregated bike lanes as a pilot project in the heart of the city along 1.4 km of Laurier Avenue West. The project was evaluated comprehensively, with data gathered relating to changes in the number of cyclists, maintenance costs, emergency vehicle response times and other metrics. Studies showed that the street carries three to four times as many cyclists without slowing other traffic or impeding emergency vehicles. In June 2013, Ottawa made the segregated bike lanes a permanent fixture.17

Page 24: www.pedbikeimages.org/ Mike Cynecki

A new approach to partnerships

Increasing the extent of cycling infrastructure and integrating it within the broader transportation network will require innovative collaborations and partnerships.

One of the critical areas is funding. Best practices from jurisdictions around the world offer a number of creative funding approaches that could be explored by all levels of government.

More infrastructure will also create a greater need for cooperation and collaboration among stakeholders. Through closer coordination, there may be opportunities to remove project barriers and streamline approvals processes for new cycling infrastructure.

New ideas are welcome. They need to be tested and evaluated. The Ontario government will support pilot projects that can provide data to build better cycling infrastructure and will develop and share relevant cycling best practices, research and information.

Areas for Action

To increase and improve cycling infrastructure within Ontario, the province will:

  • Develop a funding partnership with municipalities and the federal government to build provincial and municipal cycling routes
  • Make adherence to design guidelines conditional to receiving funding
  • Fund provincial and municipal cycling infrastructure pilot projects to test new ideas and gather data
  • Remove barriers and streamline approval processes to implement cycling infrastructure

Each of these key areas for action will be supported by specific projects, programs and initiatives identified in future Action Plans.

Page 22: Gil Penalosa, 8-80 Citie

Case Story

Multi-user parkway design

New parkway design leads the way

The Rt. Hon. Herb Gray Parkway design provides an unprecedented combination of transportation, environmental and community benefits. The community benefits, including a 20 km trail system, are integral to the project. Their implementation and long-term maintenance are included in the overall $1.4 billion designbuild- finance-maintain contract with the government's private sector partner.

Pedestrians and cyclists will be able to access the Parkway's 20 km multi-use trail network, which includes primary and secondary pathways as well as connections to existing municipal trails. The trail design includes pedestrian bridges and tunnels to allow users to travel the length of the Parkway without having to cross paths with vehicles. Along the way, there is lighting, way-finding and interpretive signage encouraging active transportation. Trailheads, located at either end of the Parkway, are granular surfaced areas designed to serve as meeting points and resting places for trail users and will include trail maps, emergency call stations and information about trail conduct. The naturalized look and colour of the trail furnishings, such as benches and lighting, will blend seamlessly with the Carolinian landscape that makes up the Parkway's 120 hectares (300 acres) of green space.


Page 23: Queen's Printer for Ontario, photo source: Ontario Growth Secretariat, Ministry of Infrastructure

Case Story

Innovative cycling infrastructure in the U.K.

Barclays Cycle Superhighways converge in London 20

One of the outstanding examples of innovative infrastructure is the cycling superhighway network now being introduced in London, England. Barclays Cycle Superhighways21 is a network of cycling routes running from outer London into central London. Bright blue surfacing is used and bike boxes (i.e. advance stop lines) are provided at signalized intersections to increase cyclist visibility. The result is safer, faster and more direct cycling routes from the outer boroughs into the city. Through a sponsorship deal, Barclays will provide up to €50 million ($80 million) by 2018 to help offset the costs of operating the superhighways and establishing a bike sharing program.

For many people, these cycling routes offer the best and quickest way to get to work. Four have been launched and another eight will be introduced by 2015. When completed, the 12 cycle superhighways will look like a clock face with routes running from outer London into central London.


Case Story

Cost sharing between levels of government

York Region provides $3-million boost to local cycling infrastructure

In June 2007, York Regional Council endorsed the Pedestrian and Cycling Municipal Partnership Program. 18 Through this program, York Region covers up to 50 per cent of the eligible construction cost for qualifying local municipal and agency pedestrian and cycling projects that have a regional context and contribute to meeting sustainable objectives of the Region's Official Plan, Transportation Master Plan, and Pedestrian and Cycling Master Plan. The program, which has an annual capital budget of $500,000, supports the development of a regional scale, commuter walking and cycling infrastructure network. Since the program's launch in 2007, York Region has approved 22 projects and allocated approximately $3.5 million to local municipalities for the implementation of active transportation facilities.


Page 26: City of Ottawa

Case Story

Cost sharing between levels of government

Quebec's multi-pronged approach

The Quebec Ministry of Transportation (MTQ) shares the costs of cycling infrastructure with Quebec municipalities through a variety of programs that are currently under review and likely to be replaced. These include:


  • Assistance Program for Alternatives to the Automobile, a five-year, $40 million infrastructure program intended to match spending by municipalities on approved active transportation projects.
  • Véloce, a $15 million program intended to provide additional support for cycling infrastructure.
  • MTQ covered 25 per cent of the capital costs of sections of La Route Verte on municipal highways as well as regional bikeways that connect to La Route Verte, a 4,700 km network of bike routes in Quebec.
  • MTQ also covers 50 per cent of the maintenance costs of sections of La Route Verte on municipal highways and trails.

3. Make Highways and Streets Safer

The safety of all road users - including cyclists - is paramount. Our goal is to make all roads safe for all road users.

Safety issues are often a source of conflict between cyclists and drivers. Cyclists are highly vulnerable in traffic and are acutely aware of the dangers if a motorist fails to yield the right-of-way, or makes an improper turn. On the other hand, there are some cyclists who disobey the rules of the road, which can tarnish the image of cycling. Like all road users, cyclists need to abide by the rules of the road and be mindful of others. Road safety is a shared responsibility.

Between 2006 and 2010, there were 129 accidental cycling deaths in Ontario.22 In the same time period, more than 12,000 cyclists and their passengers were injured in collisions that involved at least one moving motor vehicle and were reported under the Highway Traffic Act.23 This is why one of our Aspirational Goals is for Ontario's cycling environment to be safe for people of all ages, striving to achieve a record of zero fatalities and few serious injuries.

For many potential cyclists, a concern about safety is one of the top barriers that prevent them from cycling. A perception that cycling is unsafe, particularly for people who lack confidence in their cycling skills, reduces the accessibility of cycling. Increasing road safety - both real and perceived - will encourage more people to ride more often.

Page 29: Gil Penalosa, 8-80 Cities

Creating a safer road environment

Several elements combine to create a safe road environment for cyclists.

Legislation is a key component. The Highway Traffic Act (HTA) sets the rules of the road, which are designed primarily to define and enforce safe behaviour by all road users. The HTA has been updated many times over the past 90 years to respond to both persistent and emerging road safety issues. One of the most recent updates focused on the use of hand-held cell phones while operating a motor vehicle. As cycling increases in Ontario, the HTA could be updated to respond to new cycling safety issues.

A bicycle is a vehicle under the HTA, which means that cyclists have the right to use the road unless expressly prohibited. It also means that cyclists have the same responsibility to obey traffic laws as other road users. Not all cyclists or drivers understand and appreciate these rights and responsibilities.

Ontario's doctors say cycling safety and better infrastructure go hand in hand

"If we're telling kids to go ride a bike instead of sitting in front of a TV or computer screen, we all have a responsibility to ensure our roads are safe for children to ride on.

It's time to make a strong commitment to cycling infrastructure. A safe cycling system benefits everyone, including drivers and transit riders."

Dr. Scott Wooder,
President, Ontario Medical Association

Safety education is another critical component. MTO continues to promote safe cycling practices through public education activities for both motorists and cyclists to promote sharing of the road and supports organizations that provide cycle training.

Safety is linked to understanding and obeying traffic laws. People often hold a higher opinion of their own road behaviour than they do of others. In a recent survey, 61 per cent of people in Ontario say they follow the rules of the road to a high extent, whereas just 18 per cent say the same thing of other drivers.24 In that same survey, only 16 per cent of cyclists say that other cyclists follow the rules of the road to a high extent. This suggests that higher and more consistent levels of enforcement for cyclists and drivers would increase both the reality and perception of cycling as a safe activity.

Page 30: Courtesy of the Ontario Provincial Police

129 The number of accidental cycling deaths in Ontario, 2006-2010. 25

Road safety training and education can be constantly improved, sometimes by learning from the experience of other jurisdictions. In Denmark, drivers are taught to open their door with their right hand, which forces them to look over their shoulder and check for oncoming vehicles. The new edition of MTO's Driver's Handbook includes this recommendation, which could reduce the incidence of drivers "dooring" cyclists - inadvertently opening their door in the path of an oncoming bicycle.

Ramping up road safety through partnerships

Within the Ontario government, MTO plays a leadership role in creating a road environment that is safe for all users. MTO works with other ministries, municipalities and community organizations to improve the safety of our highways and streets.

Through the Road Safety Community Partnership Program, MTO supports the efforts of local road safety organizations, police and public health units to deliver awareness campaigns and events that educate and promote a culture of cycling safety in their communities. One example was a public education campaign by EnviroCentre and the City of Ottawa.

The campaign featured a series of videos promoting cycling training and safe, responsible riding practices.

In 2013, MTO piloted a new initiative with bike distributors to provide purchasers of new bicycles with cycling safety information at the point of sale.

Road-user education needs to be available in many different forms to reach different groups of people. At its most basic level, materials and instructions need to accommodate the multicultural reality of most Ontario communities. The Cycle Toronto publication, The Toronto Cyclists Handbook, for example, is available in 17 languages.

Page 33 (right): Queen's Printer for Ontario

Areas Of Action

To create a safer cycling environment for people of all ages and skill levels, the province will:

  • Review and recommend cycling-related legislation based on the latest research
  • Continue to better educate all road users on the rules of the road to build cycling skills
  • Work with police services to build consistency of enforcement of existing traffic laws to improve cycling safety

Each of these key areas for action will be supported by specific projects, programs and initiatives identified in future Action Plans.

Page 31: Gil Penalosa, 8-80 Cities

Case Story

Increasing safety by changing attitudes

Share the road, save a life

In 2012, MTO partnered with the Share the Road Cycling Coalition and Canadian Automobile Association (CAA) to develop and launch a province-wide ad campaign encouraging cyclists and motorists to share the road with one another and improve road safety for all users. Television and radio advertisements were distributed to media outlets across the province and posted on social media sites such as YouTube and Facebook. Print advertisements were featured in CAA South Central Ontario's magazine, which reaches more than 1.2 million members. Cycling safety messages were promoted through CAA's e-newsletter that is distributed to more than 400,000 subscribers.

The main thrust of the ad campaign was that many "cyclists" are also "drivers" (and vice versa), as well as parents, spouses, etc. In May 2013, the Share the Road campaign crossed the international border when the American Automobile Association and the League of American Bicyclists launched the "Share the Road" campaign nation-wide during National Bike month. As Ontario's cycling system has grown, we've learned a lot from the experiences of other jurisdictions. It is gratifying to be able to help others make their own cycling environments safer.

4. Promote Cycling Awareness and Behavioural Shifts

For cycling to be accepted as a normal, safe, convenient and valued component of our daily lives and transportation system, there needs to be a shared understanding of the function of roads.

Roads are public spaces with multiple users - pedestrians, cyclists, transit passengers and motorists. Some roads, such as urban street malls, may focus on cyclists and pedestrians, while others, such as freeways, focus on motorists. Overall, roads must safely accommodate all users under traffic laws.

For many people, this view of roads as shared public spaces may represent a new perspective but it is the foundation on which we are building a modern, integrated and efficient transportation system that incorporates cycling as a valued mode of transportation.

Making that shift in perspective will mean reaching beyond the cycling community to engage the broader public and build awareness and understanding of cycling's place in a healthy, prosperous Ontario. It will also mean educating cyclists, motorists, community leaders, city planners, engineers, police officers and others about how to create and maintain a safe cycling environment.

Building understanding and busting myths

For example, what if people better understood the benefits of cycling in very real, quantifiable terms? In Copenhagen and Ottawa, automated bike counters display in real-time the number of bikes that have passed through intersections.

And what if more people knew that, according to a Statistics Canada survey of commuters, 19 per cent of cyclists reported their commute as the most pleasant activity of the day while only 2 per cent of other commuters felt the same?26

Page 34: Goh Iromoto/Waterfront Regeneration Trust

And what if planners and engineers had a better understanding of the relative costs of infrastructure by mode, enabling them to develop more effective, site-specific infrastructure solutions?

That type of knowledge can inspire new ideas.

At the same time, we also need to correct several misunderstandings about cycling.

The "drivers versus cyclists" myth is at the top of the list. The myth assumes that there is an antagonistic relationship between drivers and cyclists, but the reality is that drivers and cyclists are not two different groups. The truth is that many "drivers" cycle and many "cyclists" drive. Seeing all road users as individuals who might use several modes of travel could help planners, engineers and community leaders to consider the real, multi-faceted needs of communities and then develop transportation infrastructure that meets those needs.

A second myth is the belief that adding more bike lanes along urban streets always means less business for local merchants. The truth is that a number of communities around the world have found that people who walk or cycle spend more money than motorists at local businesses. In Fort Worth, Texas, when new bike racks and bike lanes were added on Magnolia Street, business increased by nearly 200 per cent. 27

In Toronto's Annex neighbourhood, a study by the Clean Air Partnership confirmed the positive economic impact of cyclists and pedestrians, which encouraged local businesses to support reduced on-street parking.28

A growing role for cycling advocacy partnerships

During the past few decades, social objectives such as energy conservation and reduced tobacco use have been pursued through policy, regulatory and legislative changes. These government leadership initiatives were also supported by sustained, broad-based education and awareness campaigns.

police officer on cycle

Initiatives to increase the number of cyclists in Ontario could benefit from a similar approach. A broad, sustained education and awareness campaign promoting cycling would leverage the value of existing cycling infrastructure investments by encouraging more people to get on their bikes more often to access the cycling trails and routes in their communities or take a cycling vacation.

19 percent versus 2 percent

The number of cycling commuters (19 per cent) who reported their commute to be the most pleasant activity of their day, compared to other commuters (2%) who felt the same.29

Experience has shown that broad campaigns to change attitudes and behaviours gain the most sustainable traction when they are driven at the grassroots level. The health benefits of cycling have been recognized by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC) for many years. The ministry funds, through various programs, a wide range of cycling-promotion projects organized by local public health units, community agencies and cycling groups.

Through the Healthy Communities Fund Provincial Program Stream, MOHLTC has provided funding to organizations to develop programs designed to keep Ontarians healthy by increasing access to physical activity and supporting active transportation.

As part of the Healthy Communities Fund Partnership Stream, public health units and host agencies develop policies related to healthy eating and physical activity including active transportation.

The current Health and Physical Education curriculum in Ontario includes opportunities for students to learn about cycling and road safety and develop the skills for making safe decisions as they participate. Our public health partners routinely work with schools on bike safety under the broader mandate to reduce the frequency, severity, and impact of preventable injury. Cycling training is available through some schools.

In addition, cycling tourism and recreation programs are supported by the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport (MTCS).

As a result of these programs, many communities and organizations across the province have successful programs that promote cycling either on its own or as part of a broader, active living/active transportation promotional campaign.

In addition to cycling promotion campaigns, there are opportunities to shift public perceptions of cycling through leading by example. When municipalities integrate cycling as a mode of transportation within their own services, such as police bicycle patrols, it encourages people to accept cycling as a normal and useful form of transportation.

As cycling becomes a more common part of daily life in Ontario, it makes sense to build road user education and cycling skills into our education system. Safety rules learned at a young age can become safety habits that last a lifetime.

All of these elements - outreach, education, research and leadership - could have a tremendous impact on increasing the number of cyclists and the frequency of their trips.

The result would create long-term economic, environmental, social and personal benefits for all Ontarians.

Areas for Action

To build broad support for cycling as a healthy and valued transportation option, the province will:

  • Lead province-wide campaigns to encourage more people to cycle more often
  • Develop and share relevant cycling best practices, research and data
  • Encourage more cycling education in schools and at the community level

Each of these key areas for action will be supported by specific projects, programs and initiatives identified in future Action Plans.

Gil Penalosa, 8-80 Cities

Case Story

Cyclists as customers

Reallocating road space boosts business in Toronto neighbourhood

There is a common belief that removing on-street parking will hurt local businesses, but recent studies have shown that is not necessarily true. In 2008, the Clean Air Partnership conducted a study on Bloor Street in the Annex neighbourhood of downtown Toronto to determine the potential economic implications of reallocating road space from on-street parking to widened sidewalks or added bike lanes.30

The research indicates that only 10 per cent of business patrons drive to the area. People travelling by foot and bicycle visit more often and spend more money per month than those arriving in cars.


cyclist in copenhagen

Case Story

A cycling culture grows in Copenhagen

Build it and they will come - and cycle year round

For the past several decades, Copenhagen has been redesigning and rebuilding its roads to make them more cyclingfriendly and it has been a huge success. Today, about 36 per cent of all trips taken by Copenhagen residents are taken on bicycles. Back in 1970, only about 10 per cent of trips in Copenhagen were made by bike. 31

Some 400 km of cycle tracks - bike lanes that are separated from other traffic by a physical barrier - criss-cross the city. On some main streets, lights for cyclists turn green before the main traffic lights do, thus decreasing conflicts with motor vehicles. This safer, more convenient cycling environment has nurtured the growth of a bike culture where just about everyone rides bicycles - children and seniors, business people and students, parents with young children, MPs and mayors - even in winter.

Now 80 per cent of Copenhagen cyclists still choose bikes in January, despite an average of more than 4 cm of snowfall in the month. Snow clearance in cycle tracks is a priority. City policy mandates that snow be removed from cycle tracks before it is cleared from car lanes - with the exception of car lanes on the four largest roads, which are cleared at the same time as cycle tracks. 32


Case Story

Cycling education for children in Germany

Early cycle-skills training creates lifelong safe cycling habits

In Germany, which introduced a National Cycling Plan in 2002, 80 per cent of people own a bike.33 Approximately 95 per cent of German children receive instruction in safe cycling in elementary school. In grades one and two the focus is on coordinating mental and motor skills through exercises in the playground or gym. In grades three and four training combines both theory and practice. The theoretical part is taught in school as part of the curriculum. The practical portion is usually supervised by police officers. In almost all German states, the practical part includes riding in real traffic. A cycling proficiency test is given at the end of grade four. Some schools will not allow children to cycle to school without parental supervision if they haven't passed the test.

5. Increase Cycling Tourism Opportunities

Just as cycling has increased over the past 20 years, so have the number, length and variety of cycling routes in regions across Ontario.

Recently, MTO completed an inventory of major municipal cycling routes throughout Ontario, existing and planned. The research shows there are hundreds of existing municipal on- and off-road routes. They are found in every part of the province, from the northern landscape of Thunder Bay to the rolling hills of Prince Edward County to the dense urban traffic corridors of downtown Toronto.

Bike tourism is booming. Research by the Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport (MTCS) shows that, in 2010, two million Canadian visitors participated in cycling activities in Ontario and spent $391 million. This represents an increase of 25 per cent in the number of visitors and 18 per cent in spending over 2009.34

Not all users of the cycling routes are tourists. In urban areas, many cyclists use them to shop, commute to work and visit friends. The 2006 Census reported that nearly 20,000 people in Toronto used bicycles as their primary mode of transportation to get to work - a 32 per cent increase over the previous five years.35

Collaborative partnerships to build a province-wide network

In Ontario, most cycling routes have been developed by municipalities and local organizations to respond to the local needs of cyclists and to reap the economic benefits of increased tourism. For the most part, routes are not coordinated or interconnected between jurisdictions.

camera with cyclist in the lens

$391 million The amount spent by tourists who participated in cycling activities in Ontario in 2010.36

MTCS is the government lead for trails planning and coordination. It currently oversees the implementation of the Ontario Trails Strategy (2005), which encourages on- and off-road cycling as sport/recreation, tourism and active transportation activities. MTCS has provided support for a range of cycling-related projects through its various funding programs.

The continued growth in cycling by both residents and tourists will create greater need for more route-supportive infrastructure such as intermodal connections, bike-sharing programs and transportation options between the routes.

Sometimes the building of links and the closing of gaps can be accelerated through funding partnerships. To maximize existing municipal investments, the Government of Ontario will focus its cycling infrastructure investments, subject to available funding, on closing the gaps between existing cycling routes with the goal of creating a provincial network of bike routes.

Areas for Action

To encourage the growth of cycling tourism, the province will:

  • Promote Ontario as a premier cycling tourism destination
  • Identify a province-wide cycling network and use it to prioritize future infrastructure investments on provincial highways
  • Improve cycling tourism experiences in Ontario and inter-modal cycling connections by working with our partners to provide end-of-trip facilities, maps of existing cycling routes and way-finding applications

Each of these key areas for action will be supported by specific projects, programs and initiatives identified in future Action Plans.

cycle route road sign

Case Story

Quebec's awardwinning cycling route

Quebec's Route Verte, recognized by National Geographic as the world's premier cycling route, is a 5,300 km network of paved shoulders, off-road trails, designated shared roadways on quiet roads, bike lanes, and barrier-separated cycle tracks stretching from the Gaspé Peninsula to the Ontario border, and from the US border to the Abitibi.

Development of the network began in 1995 with a 10-year commitment of $88.5 million of funding and technical support from the Quebec Ministry of Transportation. Officially opened in 2007, the network is undergoing an expansion phase that will add 900 km. La Route Verte is now 95 per cent completed with 5,000 km opened. Coordination of planning, interregional cooperation, communications and promotion is handled by the non-profit organization Vélo Québec.


cyclist on foresty trail

Case Story

The Great Waterfront Trail

Multi-purpose cycling routes

Most bike routes are used for a range of purposes, and the Waterfront Trail is no exception. This trail stretches 730 km along the shore of Lake Ontario from Niagara-on-the-Lake to the Quebec border and connects 41 communities. While most cyclists along the route use it for recreational purposes, research by the Waterfront Regeneration Trust shows that 24 per cent of all trail users regularly use the trail to commute.37

As a sign of the growing popularity of cycling in Ontario, the Waterfront Trail expanded westwards along Lake Erie in 2013, adding a second Great Lake, another 620 km and 27 new waterfront communities along a signed, mostly on-road route. Today the Waterfront Trail is close to 1,400 km in length.

The Waterfront Regeneration Trust is also working in partnership with the Greenbelt Foundation to create a cycling route to connect and showcase Greenbelt communities. The business community and tourism partners will be part of the project through Transportation Options' Welcome Cyclists program.


Case Story

Iowa Trails 2000

How Iowa is creating a state trails network

Iowa Trails 2000 is a proposed 7,853 km interconnected, multi-modal, easily accessible state-wide trails system connecting communities, parks, shopping, employment and other amenities. The first step in preparing the plan was the completion of an inventory of existing and proposed trails. This was augmented with information about the location of cultural, archaeological, heritage, recreation and other sites. When mapped, conceptual corridors began to emerge. These were presented at a series of open houses and then refined based on the feedback.

The Iowa Department of Transportation State Transportation Plan (2012) includes a commitment to focus investments on state-wide trails and continue investments on regional and local trails. A separate bicycle and pedestrian plan is under development. 38


Achieving the Vision through Action

The pace of change is accelerating within Ontario. The number of cyclists is increasing. New cycling infrastructure is being designed and built. We are moving forward quickly.

This Cycling Strategy is designed to build on that momentum. If offers a 20-year Vision and a set of Aspirational Goals that provide a clear sense of direction. It also identifies a series of interconnected Strategic Directions that are broad enough to provide the flexibility needed to seize opportunities as they arise.

The Government of Ontario is committed to this Strategy, but ultimately what will determine its success is the power of partnerships. Cycling in Ontario involves many organizations.

The Government of Ontario consulted broadly during the development of the Strategy to ensure it understood stakeholders' goals for cycling, their plans and their concerns. Through this Strategy, the government is giving cycling stakeholders a clear picture of where the province aspires to be on cycling in 20 years. Now the government is asking for municipalities, school boards, the broader public, road users, businesses and nongovernmental organizations to partner with us in creating a more cycling-friendly future for Ontario.

Implementation of this Cycling Strategy is underway. The first Action Plan will be released within the coming months. It will identify the specific projects, programs, initiatives and partnerships needed that will help us move towards our Goals.

On an annual basis the government will meet with stakeholders to share the status of progress being made on implementing the strategy ensuring that stakeholder and government priorities are reflected.

cyclist at the water front

Appendix

#CycleON Workshop Participants

  • Gil Penalosa, 8-80 Cities
  • Michael Jacek, Senior Advisor, Association of Municipalities of Ontario
  • Christine Allum,Community Relations Specialist, CAA, Canadian Automobile Association
  • Jay Paleja, Policy Advisor, Association of Municipalities of Ontario
  • David Chernushenko, Sustainability educator, Producer - Bike City, Great City , City councillor, Ottawa
  • Zlatko Krstulic,Transportation Planner, City of Ottawa
  • Adam KrupperActive Transportation Coordinator, City of Thunder Bay / EcoSuperior Environmental Programs
  • Daniel Egan, Manager, Cycling Infrastructure & Programs, City of Toronto
  • Mike Layton, Toronto City Councillor, Ward 19, Trinity-Spadina
  • Jane Mustac, Manager of Transportation Planning, County of Essex
  • Jared Kolb, Executive Director, Cycle Toronto
  • Andy Wilson, Para-Cycling / CAN-BIKE Coordinator, Cycling Canada
  • Chris Drew, Co-Captain, Bike 27, Cycle Toronto's Ward 27 Advocacy Group
  • Ken Greenberg, Principal, Greenberg Consultants Inc.
  • Dave Richardson, Senior Project Manager and Partner, MMM Group
  • Jackie Gervais, Health Promoter, Niagara Region Public Health
  • T/Sgt Brett Carson, Provincial Coordinator - Provincial Offences and Devices, Highway Safety Division - Provincial Traffic Operations, Ontario Provincial Police
  • Marco Beghetto, VP Communications and New Media, Ontario Trucking Association
  • Eleanor McMahon, CEO and Founder, Share the Road Cycling Coalition
  • Nancy Smith Lea, Director, Toronto Centre for Active Transportation
  • Trudy Ledsham Project Manager, Toronto Cycling Think and Do Tank. University of Toronto
  • Marlaine Koehler, Executive Director, Waterfront Regeneration Trust
  • The Bicycle Trade Association of Canada
  • Hans Moor President, Citizens for Safe Cycling
  • Yvonne Bambrick, Urban Cycling Consultant

Related Online Resources

Design healthy, active and prosperous communities

Improve cycling infrastructure

Making highways and streets safer

Increase cycling tourism opportunities

International perspectives

Additional online cycling resources: A starter set

A wealth of additional cycling-related information and data is available online. Most municipalities have cycling maps and lists of cycling events on their websites, and many public health units also include news and information about active living and cycling on their websites.

If you'd like to delve into the wider world of cycling, here are a few sites that can get you started.

Ontario
Canada
International

Endnotes

  1. Office of the Chief Coroner of Ontario, "Cycling Death Review" (2012), pg. 20.
  2. Darren E.R. Warburton, Crystal Whitney Nicol, and Shannon S.D. Bredin, "Health benefits of physical activity: the evidence", Canadian Medical Association Journal, 2006 March 14; 174(6): 801-809,
  3. Ontario Medical Association, "Enhancing Cycling Safety in Ontario" (2011).pg. 2.
  4. Katzmarzyk PT, Gledhill N, Shephard RJ. The economic burden of physical inactivity in Canada. CMAJ (2000)163(11): 1435-40, as cited in Canadian Medical Association, "Active Transportation," (2009), pg 1,
  5. Natural Resources Canada, "Emission impacts resulting from vehicle idling", .
  6. Environment Canada, Greenhouse Gas Emissions Data
  7. Toronto Public Health, "Air Pollution Burden of Illness from Traffic in Toronto: Problems and Solutions" (2007).
  8. Statistics Canada, "Travel Survey of Residents of Canada" and "International Travel Survey", 2006, computed by the Ontario Ministry of Tourism and Culture.
  9. Niagara Region, Economic Value: Active Transportation and Tourism,
  10. Clean Air Partnership, Bike Lanes, On-Street Parking and Business: A Study of Bloor Street in Toronto's Annex Neighbourhood (2009),
  11. Statistics Canada Census (2006)
  12. Statistics Canada Census (2006)
  13. Statistics Canada Census (2006), as cited in City of Toronto Cycling Statistics Tables,
  14. Bill Yetman, Bicycle Trade Association of Canada.
  15. Woodcock, et al, Public health benefits of strategies to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions: urban land transport," in Lancet, 2009; 374(9705):1930-43.
  16. North Carolina Department of Transportation, "Complete Streets Planning and Design Guidelines", July 2012, pg. 4.
  17. City of Ottawa, "Laurier Segregated Bike Lane Pilot Project: July 2013 update," (2013) PowerPoint presentation to Transportation Committee, and "Laurier Avenue Segregated Bicycle Lanes Pilot Project,"Report to Transportation Committee and Council (2013),; Ottawa Citizen, "Laurier bike lanes here to stay," July 17, 2013.
  18. York Region,
  19. Share the Road Cycling Coalition, "Provincial Bicycling Organization Releases Polling Data Highlighting Support for Active Transportation in Metrolinx's The Big Move", (May 27, 2013), media release,
  20. Transport for London, "Barclays Cycle Superhighways FAQs" (2012).
  21. Transport for London,
  22. Office of the Chief Coroner of Ontario, "Cycling Death Review" (2012),
  23. Ontario Ministry of Transportation, "Ontario Road Safety Annual Report 2010,"
  24. Ontario Ministry of Transportation, "2013 Road Safety Marketing Attitude and Behaviour Survey"
  25. Office of the Chief Coroner of Ontario, "Cycling Death Review" (2012),
  26. Statistics Canada. Like commuting? Workers' perceptions of their daily commute (2006),
  27. Elly Blue, "Bikenomics: The Economic Case for On-Street Bike Parking. Grist,"; Niagara Region, Active Transportation and Local Businesses (2011),
  28. Clean Air Partnership, Bike Lanes, On-Street Parking and Business: A Study of Bloor Street in Toronto's Annex Neighbourhood (2009),
  29. Statistics Canada. Like commuting? Workers' perceptions of their daily commute (2006),
  30. Clean Air Partnership, Bike Lanes, On-Street Parking and Business: A Study of Bloor Street in Toronto's Annex Neighbourhood (2009),
  31. City of Copenhagen, "Copenhagen City of Cyclists, Bicycle Account" (2012),
  32. Denmark, The Official Website of Denmark, "Cycling in Copenhagen - The easy way,"
  33. German Traffic Guard, "Bicycle training - core school road safety education", translation by Philip Hartung,
  34. Statistics Canada, "Travel Survey of Residents of Canada" and "International Travel Survey", 2006, computed by the Ontario Ministry of Tourism and Culture.
  35. Statistics Canada Census (2006), as cited in City of Toronto Cycling Statistics Tables,
  36. Statistics Canada, "Travel Survey of Residents of Canada" and "International Travel Survey", 2006, computed by the Ontario Ministry of Tourism and Culture.
  37. Waterfront Regeneration Trust, "Fast Facts about the Trail," (2013).
  38. Iowa Department of Transportation, "Iowa in Motion: State Transportation Plan", 2012.
Back to Top