Commercial Vehicle Operators’ Safety Manual

Module 8 - Preventive Maintenance, Record-Keeping and Vehicle Files

Overview

The Carrier Safety and Enforcement Branch of the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario has prepared this guide to assist and ensure that truck and bus companies (commercial-vehicle operators) operate safely and are compliant with the regulations that govern highway use. Ontario, other provinces, the Government of Canada and the transportation industry developed the rules and regulations to help reduce the number and severity of collisions. Each jurisdiction has used the National Safety Code standards as guides in drafting their own transportation safety legislation. This approach promotes uniformity across Canada and helps to ensure that the transportation industry remains as viable and sustainable as possible.

This guide applies to Ontario operators of commercial motor vehicles that are:

  • Trucks, tractors or trailers, or a combination of these vehicles, that have a registered gross vehicle weight or actual weight of more than 4,500 kilograms
  • Tow trucks, regardless of registered gross weight or actual weight
  • Buses with a manufactured seating capacity of 10 persons or more, excluding the driver
  • Accessible vehicles and school-purposes vehicles, depending upon use

The guide contains several modules, each dealing with a specific topic. To get a complete picture of compliance requirements, you should obtain the complete guide. If you intend to use certain parts of this guide only (for example, Module 1, "Getting Started”) it is recommended that you also obtain the modules "Introduction” and "Commercial Vehicle Operators’ Registration.”

This is a guide only and is not meant to be a substitute for the relevant statutes and regulations. This guide highlights some important legal provisions but is not an exhaustive description of all the laws that apply.

Preventive Maintenance, Record-Keeping and Vehicle Files Learning Objectives

As you work through this module, you will be able to:

  • Determine if you need a preventive-maintenance program.
  • Determine your responsibilities regarding your vehicles.
  • Plan for and complete required daily inspections.
  • Identify and plan for all required vehicle inspections.
  • Develop and use inspection schedules and inspection reports.
  • Meet the requirements of the Commercial Vehicle Inspection Program (CVIP).
  • Meet the requirements of driver and vehicle roadside Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) inspections conducted on drivers and vehicles.
  • Meet the requirement of the Bus Information Tracking System (BITS) for bus operators.
  • Ensure that vehicle records are appropriately completed and kept.

Truck, Bus and Trailer Maintenance

Purpose

The purpose of this module is to provide information to operators about the minimum requirements for the maintenance, inspection and component performance standards for trucks, trailers and buses.

Requirements

Operators of trucks, buses and towed trailers, to which the regulations apply, are required to:

  • Establish a written schedule to periodically inspect and maintain vehicles.
  • Ensure that inspections and maintenance are carried out in accordance with the written schedule.
  • Ensure that vehicles meet the prescribed performance standards at all times while operating on a highway.
  • Ensure drivers conduct daily inspections.
  • Maintain valid annual or semi-annual inspections on all applicable vehicles.

Performance Standards

Prescribed Performance Standards for the vehicle are set out in the following Highway Traffic Act (HTA) Regulations;

  • HTA Regulation 199/07 (Commercial Motor Vehicle Inspections).
  • HTA Regulation 611 (Safety Inspections) Schedule 1 and 2
  • HTA Regulation 612 (School Buses)
  • HTA Regulation 587 (Equipment)

Preventive Maintenance Program

To meet regulatory requirements, a maintenance and inspection program must be established by the operator and recorded in a schedule. A program to periodically inspect and maintain vehicles can be a simple written or electronic document that sets out, for example, a stated time period and/or distance when a vehicle requires its next inspection and/or maintenance activity.

Inspections and maintenance intervals are commonly linked. For example, an inspection is due at 30,000 km or three months, whichever occurs first. Non-safety-related maintenance items such as oil changes and tune-ups can be included in the schedule. An annual or semi-annual safety inspection can also be part of the written schedule.

Each operator must review the regulations to see which requirements apply to them, and should draft their maintenance and inspection program accordingly.

An operator must maintain a copy of their maintenance program at their principal place of business or at another terminal or business address specified by them.

It is the operator’s responsibility to ensure that:

  • Commercial vehicles are inspected according to all provincial regulations, and are maintained in safe operating condition.
  • Employees understand the maintenance program requirements that apply to them.
  • The program is fully implemented.
  • All vehicle files are maintained as specified by Section 16 of HTA Regulation 199/07 (Commercial Motor Vehicle Inspections).
  • The maintenance records required by Section 16 of HTA Regulation 199/07 are retained for two years, or six months after the vehicle ceases to be used by the operator.
  • Processes are in place to monitor the effectiveness of the maintenance program.

Vehicle Inspections

Commercial motor vehicles are subject to a number of inspections and record-keeping requirements. The next sections of this module outline the requirements, frequency and record-keeping for the following:

  1. Daily inspection – HTA Regulation 199/07 (Commercial Motor Vehicle Inspections)
  2. Annual inspections – HTA Regulation 611 (Safety Inspections)
  3. Semi-annual inspections (buses) – HTA Regulation 611 (Safety Inspections)
  4. CVSA inspections
  5. Safety Standard Certificates – HTA Regulation 611 (Safety Inspections)
  6. Bus inspections

Daily Inspections

Purpose

The purpose of the daily vehicle inspection is to ensure that problems and defects have been identified before the vehicle is operated on the highway. Inspections prevent the operation of a vehicle with problems that are likely to cause or contribute to the severity of an accident.

Brief Overview of Daily Inspection Program

  • Driver conducts an inspection of a vehicle or vehicles before operating them.
  • The inspection is conducted with the use of a schedule listing the vehicle components and systems that require inspection.
  • Driver completes a report of the inspection.
  • The inspection and report are valid for 24 hours.
  • Driver carries the inspection schedule and report in the vehicle.
  • Driver also records on the report any defects found while en route and at the end of the trip or day.
  • Driver reports defects to the operator at the time they are discovered; the operator must repair the defect immediately, or before the next dispatch, and keep records of repair.

Vehicles That Require Daily Inspection

  • Trucks, trailers and converter dollies that, on their own or in combination, have a total gross weight or registered gross weight exceeding 4,500 kilograms
  • Buses designed to transport 10 or more passengers, and any trailer towed by one of these vehicles
  • Inter-city bus commonly known as a motor coach that has,
    • Motive power mounted to the rear of the front axle,
    • Air-ride or torsion bar suspension,
    • A baggage area that is separate from the passenger cabin, and
    • A passenger cabin with reclining seats for passengers
  • Accessible buses modified to be used to transport persons with disabilities, if not being used for personal purposes only; and every trailer towed by one of these vehicles
  • School-purposes vehicles and buses operating under contract with a school board or other authority in charge of a school, and being used for the transportation of six or more children or adults with a developmental disability.

Vehicles Exempt from Inspection

General Vehicles

  • A truck with a combined registered gross weight and actual weight of 4,500 kilograms or less, whether towing a trailer or not
  • A personal-use pickup truck or bus
  • A truck or bus leased for personal use only by an individual for 30 days or less
  • A commercial motor vehicle that is being road-tested, for the purposes of repairs, within 30 kilometres of a facility where the vehicle is being repaired by an automotive service technician or a truck and coach technician who hold valid certification under the Apprenticeship and Certification Act, 1998, or by an apprentice under that Act
  • An empty truck or bus operated under the authority of a dealer plate or service plate
  • A historic vehicle (with permit)
  • An ambulance, fire vehicle, cardiac-arrest emergency vehicle, hearse, casket wagon, mobile crane and tow truck
  • An emergency vehicle with towed trailer while responding to or returning from an emergency
  • A truck and towed trailer providing relief from an earthquake, flood, fire, famine, drought, epidemic, pestilence or other disaster by transporting passengers or goods
  • A trailer converter dolly that is not carrying a trailer
  • A road-building machine
  • A bus and towed trailer that is operated by, or on behalf of, a municipality as part of a public transit service, either within the municipality or within 25 km of its boundary
Recreational Vehicles
  • A motor home and pickup truck with the camper installed, including any type of trailer or vehicle towed by the motor home or truck camper
  • A truck, regardless of size and weight, that is towing a house trailer being used for personal purposes
  • A house trailer being used for personal purposes
  • A car tow dolly.

Farm Vehicles

  • A two- or three-axle truck or tractor, not drawing a trailer, that is mainly used to transport primary products of a farm, forest, sea or lake, which are produced or harvested by the driver or the driver’s employer (includes farm-plated trucks); primary products including fruit, vegetables, livestock, horses and poultry
  • A self-propelled implement of husbandry, farm tractor or any towed farm equipment
  • Farm equipment towed by a commercial motor vehicle.

Inspection Required by Driver or Other Person

Drivers are not permitted to operate a commercial motor vehicle or bus, or tow a trailer unless the driver or another person has conducted an inspection of the vehicle(s) within the previous 24 hours.

In addition to the initial inspection – whether conducted by the driver or not – the driver is required to monitor the condition of the vehicle(s) for defects while en route.

Other people, such as another driver, maintenance or yard staff, are also permitted to conduct inspections. They must sign the report, and are responsible under the law for the inspection and the information contained in it.

In order for the driver to utilize an inspection done by another individual, the driver must sign the inspection report. The driver may rely on such inspections as proof that the inspection was conducted as required and produce the report for an officer, unless the driver has reason to believe that the inspection and report do not meet the requirements, or the driver is aware or ought to be aware that the vehicle has a defect. If the driver has doubts about the inspection and report, they should complete a new inspection of the vehicle.

Note: Only the driver is referenced as the inspection person throughout the remainder of this document.

Inspection Procedures:

Drivers may choose an inspection procedure (circle procedure or walk-around) that best suits the vehicle and its location. However, no matter which order of items you choose to inspect the vehicle, the driver must inspect each item on the applicable inspection schedule. The defects that are discovered must be recorded on the inspection report, and the operator notified about the defects. Drivers are also required to carry and produce an inspection schedule based on the vehicle, as well as a corresponding valid inspection report.

Daily Inspection Schedules

Application of Inspection Schedule

Sample inspection schedules are available in Appendix A of this module.

HTA Regulation 199/07 has six inspections schedules; drivers are to use the schedule that is based on the type of commercial motor vehicle being operated. The schedules outline the inspection criteria, and identify if a defect is "minor” or "major.” The way a driver handles a vehicle defect will differ, depending on whether it is a minor defect or a major defect.

If a driver finds no defect on the vehicle, as defined in the inspection schedule, then "no defect” is recorded, and the inspection is valid for 24 hours.

If a driver finds a minor defect on the vehicle, as defined in the inspection schedule, the defect must be recorded reported to the operator as soon as possible. The operator is required to repair any defects that do not meet the performance standards. The inspection is valid for 24 hours.

If a driver finds a major defect on the vehicle, as defined in the inspection schedule, the vehicle cannot be operated. The driver must record the defect, report it to the operator immediately, and the vehicle must be repaired prior to operation.

Ontario's Six Daily Inspection Schedules

  • Schedule 1 is used to inspect a truck, tractor and towed trailer. A converter dolly is inspected as part of the trailer it is carrying. The dolly must be inspected again when carrying a different trailer.
  • Schedule 2 is used to inspect a bus (other than school-purposes buses), motor coach, accessible bus and towed trailer. Schedule 2 continues to apply when one of these vehicles is being used for school charter trips. Schedule 2 is also used to inspect any trailer towed by a bus, school bus, school-purposes bus or school-purposes vehicle.
  • A motor coach may be inspected using Schedule 2 only, or may be inspected using Schedules 3 and 4 in combination with each other.
  • Schedule 5 is used to inspect a yellow school bus, school-purposes bus and school- purposes accessible bus.
    • This applies even when a school bus is used for non-school purposes (for example, carrying adults or children to festivals, sporting events, church functions and so on).
    • A bus is considered to be for school purposes if it has been operated by the current operator, under contract with a school board or other authority in charge of a school, for school service or school charters.
  • Schedule 6 is used to inspect a school-purposes vehicle (van or station wagon). A daily inspection is required only when one of these vehicles is being used for the transportation of six or more children, six or more adults with a developmental disability, or six or more persons from both categories.

Under-Vehicle Inspections (Schedule 4)

If a motor coach is inspected using Schedule 3, then a Schedule 4 under-vehicle inspection must be completed every 12,000 km or 30 days, whichever comes first. These inspections are conducted by technicians who hold a valid certificate of qualification as a truck and coach technician.

The inspection requires a detailed examination of the under-vehicle components and systems of the coach. Schedule 4 inspections are conducted while the coach is positioned over a pit, or raised in a manner that provides adequate access to all of the applicable under-vehicle components.

Technicians are required to sign the Schedule 4 inspection report certifying that the components and systems inspected under Schedule 4 meet the prescribed standards on the date of inspection.

Carry and Produce Schedules

Drivers are required to carry and produce the inspection schedule upon request by an officer.

The schedule and inspection report may be combined in the same document. If more than one schedule is used for the commercial vehicle, then all relevant schedules must be carried by the driver. (For example, a motor coach towing a trailer may have schedules 3 and 4 for the motor coach and Schedule 2 for the trailer.)

Where to Get Inspection Schedules

Operators are required to supply drivers with a copy of the inspection schedule.

Regulated schedules are provided in the appendix of this module, and may be copied or reproduced without consent of the ministry.

Schedules 1, 2, 3 and 4 of National Safety Code Standard 13, published by the Canadian Council of Transport Administrators (CCMTA), is also acceptable in Ontario, including when produced by the operator of an Ontario-plated commercial motor vehicle.  School buses and school-purposes vehicles must be inspected using Schedules 5 and 6, respectively, of HTA Regulation 199/07.  CCMTA Schedules can be found on www.ccmta.ca.

Operators may add additional sections that contain more inspection components and systems to a schedule.  Inspection items within sections that have been added by the operator, and are not part of the regulated inspection items, are not required to be inspected, recorded or reported as defects.  Operators may require drivers to inspect, record and report these added defects or conditions.

If a vehicle is not fitted with a system or component (for example, air brakes), then the entire section can be deleted.  Section numbers may be deleted or re-numbered.  However, individually regulated inspection items within a section, such as "audible air leak" cannot be removed unless the entire section is deleted and the vehicle does not have air brakes.  Also, individually regulated inspection items cannot be moved between minor and major columns within a schedule, or be reworded.

Operators are permitted to regroup the minor and major defect columns, provided the regrouping does not confuse the reader.  Operators are free to add defect codes within the columns of a schedule.  A code number or letter is placed beside a component or system on a schedule.  When a defect is found, the driver can enter the defect code on the inspection report, instead of handwriting the details.  When defect codes are added to a schedule and used by a driver, a coded schedule must be presented to the enforcement officer.

See the appendices at the end of this module for a sample of acceptable inspection schedules.

Daily Inspection Reports

Sample inspection reports are available in Appendix B of this module.

Inspection reports serve as communication between drivers, the operator and the operator's maintenance department. Reports are used to verify inspections, record defects, report defects and may be used to verify repairs. Reports are completed immediately following an inspection.

Types of Daily Inspection Reports

  • Single-day sheet report – a report can consist of a single sheet of paper containing one day's information. This type of report can be located at the back of an hours of service logbook or in a snap set where one report is removed for each day and so on.
  • Multi-day report book – this contains lines for each day that the vehicle is inspected. The book is assigned to one vehicle, and may remain in the vehicle until the book is full. The basic vehicle information is written once on the front cover or elsewhere within the book. The book may also contain the vehicle's inspection schedule.

The information provided about inspection reports applies to both types of reports, unless the report type is specifically named.

Completing Daily Inspection Reports

The driver is required to fill out and sign a report upon completion of the inspection.

Bus drivers are required to fill out and sign a report upon completion of the inspection, regardless of the distance to be travelled and whether or not passengers are carried.

If the driver did not conduct the original inspection, the driver and each subsequent driver must sign the report. Reports that are used by more than one driver require additional lines for subsequent signatures.

Any number of trailers may be inspected and added to a single report if the report contains additional lines for additional trailers.

All information required on a report must be accurate and complete.

Validity Period of Daily Inspection Reports

  • A report certifying schedules 1, 2, 3, 5 or 6 inspections are valid for 24 hours from the time of inspection.
  • A Schedule 3 inspection must be accompanied by a Schedule 4 under-vehicle inspection report.
    • A report completed and certified by a technician for a Schedule 4 under-vehicle inspection is valid to the end of the 30th day after the day of inspection, or for 12,000 km, whichever comes first.

Carry and Produce Daily Inspection Reports

Drivers must carry and produce valid inspection reports upon request of an officer.

  • Drivers who are towing a trailer must record the information for the power unit and the trailer on one report, or carry two inspection reports – one for the vehicle and one for the trailer.
  • The driver of a motor coach that has been inspected under Schedule 3, combined with Schedule 4, must carry and produce a report for both inspections. Completed Schedule 4 inspection reports are supplied by the operator who receives the report from the technician.
  • When a motor coach has been inspected under Schedule 3, combined with Schedule 4, but the Schedule 4 under-vehicle inspection has expired and a new Schedule 4 inspection cannot be completed, the coach must be inspected under Schedule 2. In this case, a copy of Schedule 2 must be carried and produced.

Submitting Daily Inspection Reports to the Operator

Single Daily Inspection Reports

Expired reports must be forwarded to the operator as soon as possible, but no later than 20 days after the date of inspection.

Reports must be forwarded to the operator's principal place of business, or to a terminal or business address specified by the operator.

Daily Inspection Report Books

Report books that are full, or have passed the operator's pre-determined end-date or use period, must be forwarded to the operator's principal place of business, or to a terminal or business address specified by the operator.

NOTE: If the daily inspection reports are contained in a book that is kept in the commercial motor vehicle, and the operator has regular access to the vehicle, the reports are deemed to be submitted when they are in the truck, bus or school-purposes vehicle, and do not have to be forwarded to the office within the 20-day timeframe.

Where to Get Daily Inspection Reports

  • Operators are required to supply drivers with the appropriate reports

Handing Over Valid Daily Inspection Reports to Another Driver

  • A driver may hand over a valid original copy of a daily inspection report to another driver who is driving for the same operator. The second driver is obligated to submit the report to the operator.
  • A driver may hand over a duplicate copy of the original inspection report or a hand-written reproduction to a driver working for a different operator. In this case, each driver must submit a report to their respective operators.
  • There is no legal obligation under the HTA for a driver to hand over a report to another driver, whether or not they drive for the same operator. However, there may be a contractual or an employment-law obligation to pass along a report to another driver.
  • A driver who receives a valid daily or under-vehicle report for a vehicle that was inspected by another person may rely on the report as proof that the inspection was conducted as required, unless the driver has reason to believe otherwise. The report is valid, provided the current driver has signed the inspection report.

Contents of Daily Inspection Reports

Both single reports and report books must contain the following minimum line items:

  • Licence-plate number and plate jurisdiction of the vehicle
  • Operator's name
  • Date and time of the inspection
  • City, town, village or highway location where the inspection was conducted
  • Printed name of the person who conducted the inspection
  • Odometer reading of the commercial motor vehicle
  • List of major and minor defects found during the inspection, if any
  • A statement that no major or minor defects were found, if none
  • Major and minor defects found while en route
  • A statement, signed by the person who conducted the inspection, that the vehicle was inspected in accordance with this regulation
  • Signature of each driver who did not conduct the initial inspection

Line-item language may be altered to a "like meaning." Any altered language must continue to indicate what the completed information means. Operators are free to add and re-arrange line items.

The Ministry of Transportation does not approve blank inspection reports for operators. Operators are required to purchase or create a report that complies with the requirements of Section 7 of Regulation 199/07, Daily Inspection Report.

Operators can combine daily inspection reports with schedules, and they can be on the same document. Single reports may also be combined with hours of service logbooks, as long as all line items for both requirements are included. Here are two examples:

Example 1

  • The daily inspection report requires a line item for the odometer reading. The logbook requires the driver to record the odometer readings at the start and end of the shift/trip. Also, if the driver uses the vehicle for personal transportation to a place of lodging or so on during the trip, there is a requirement to enter the start and finish odometer readings for this personal distance travelled.
  • Therefore, a combined daily report and logbook may require five different odometer line items representing five readings, if the daily inspection were conducted at a different distance from when the driver started the trip and the vehicle was used for personal purposes during the trip.
  • If a vehicle is never used for personal purposes during a trip, it is not necessary to have these odometer line items on either a logbook report or a combined daily report.

Example 2

If the vehicle is always inspected at the same starting location as the driver's trip or shift, a check box may be used to indicate that the odometer reading applies to the inspection reading, as well as the driver's start reading.

  • Odometer reading, start of driver's day and at time of inspection (enter value)

Sample Daily Inspection Reports

Inspection-report formats and layouts are not prescribed by regulation. The regulation sets out a minimum of information to be recorded on a report.

Reports may, at the option of the operator:

  • Contain an inspection checklist and additional information
  • Single reports may be printed at the back of hours of service logbooks
  • Information may be permanently printed on the reports when it does not change (for example, operator’s name, plate number and so on)
  • Reports may also be printed with the vehicle's inspection schedule(s).
  • Reports other than report books may be produced in carbon or carbonless sets that automatically create extra copies when the top page is completed. Some operators may prefer to use multi-copied reports for internal distribution purposes. Also, valid legible copies of these reports may be passed on to the next driver of a vehicle, while the person who inspected the vehicle retains the original.
Many variations of a report are possible, depending on the operation of the vehicles and inspection personnel. Operators are free to create a report that best meets the needs of their operation.

In the following samples, "Signature of each driver who was not the inspection person" may be removed if the vehicle is inspected by the driver and not driven by a second driver.

See the appendices at the end of this module for samples.

Certification of Repairs

Ontario operators may include a "certification of repairs" section on inspection reports to track defects and repairs.

When a report lists a defect, and the defect was repaired without the operator creating a separate repair order, the repair and any parts used must be noted on the report. In this case, the report becomes a maintenance record and must be retained for two years.

This applies whether or not the report contains a separate "certification of repairs" section.

Samples may be found in the appendices at the end of this module.

Daily Inspection Report Books Kept in the Vehicle

Report books kept in the vehicle may only be used for a vehicle that returns at the end of the day to a location where the operator has access to the vehicle and the book. The operator must be able to produce the book upon an officer's request. Also, defects written in the book must be reported to the operator verbally, by telephone or other means when the book is not handed into the operator.

A report book must be carried, and produced upon the request of an officer. If the inspection schedule is not contained within the book, the driver is required to carry and produce the applicable schedule.

The following information must be printed somewhere on or in the book;

  • Operator's name
  • Licence-plate number
  • Plate jurisdiction of the vehicle

Sample optional information items that may be printed somewhere on or in the book:

  • Unit number
  • Vehicle identification number
  • Make of vehicle
  • Year of vehicle
  • Period covered

See the appendices at the back of this module for samples.

Vehicle Defects

Recording Defects

The driver is required to record a defect on the report immediately after the initial inspection, upon discovery of a defect while travelling (at the first opportunity when vehicle is stopped and parked safely off the highway), or when discovered at the end of a trip or day.

Reporting Defects

For the purposes of reporting defects, the operator may designate an employee to receive them.

Minor and major defects, which are listed in a schedule, must be reported to the operator immediately upon discovery by the driver or inspection person.

Depending upon the driver's situation, reporting to the operator may be done in person, by phone, via written report or by electronic means.

Driving with Defects

A driver may continue to drive with a minor defect that is listed on an inspection schedule if  the defect has been entered immediately on the daily inspection report and reported to the operator.

It is a defence for a driver, if charged with a defect under another part of the HTA, when that defect is also listed on the vehicle’s inspection schedule.  This defence applies only if the driver has found, recorded and reported the defect to the operator prior to an examination of the vehicle by an officer.

It is important to note that, while the driver has a defence for driving with a minor defect listed on a schedule, the operator can be charged.

Use of Electronic Devices and Documents

Daily inspection reports and under-vehicle reports, results of an inspection, and inspection schedules may be kept in an electronic recording device.

When requested by an officer, the driver is required to produce, at the driver's option, either:

  • An electronic display of the report or schedule that is readable from outside the vehicle by the officer
  • A printed copy of the report or schedule signed by the driver after printing
  • A handwritten copy of the report or schedule signed by the driver
NOTE:
  • The electronic display is not required to have a signature.
  • An officer may, at his or her discretion, enter a vehicle to read the screen of an in-cab, permanently attached device.

Vehicle maintenance, repair records and documents may also be kept in electronic format, provided that the operator or a person designated by the operator prints and signs a copy of a report or document when requested by an officer.

Daily Inspection Report Retention Period and Location

Inspection reports and notices issued by an officer are to be stored at the operator's principal place of business, or at a terminal or business address specified by the operator.

Daily inspection reports are to be kept for at least six months. However, if it is also used to record a repair or work done on the vehicle, it is deemed to be a "maintenance report,” and must be retained for at least two years, or six months after the vehicle ceases to be the operator's responsibility.

Out-of-Province and US Vehicles

Out-of-Province Canadian Vehicles

Vehicles plated in a province or territory other than Ontario may operate in Ontario if the vehicle(s) were inspected and an inspection report completed, in accordance with the daily inspection requirements of:

  • The province or territory in which the vehicle is base plated
  • National Safety Code Standard 13
  • Ontario HTA Regulation 199/07, as detailed in this module
This applies regardless of the distance to be travelled in Ontario, and whether or not inspection rules apply or the vehicle is exempt in its home province or territory.

This also applies to out-of-province plated vehicles that are driven by Ontario licensed drivers who drive the vehicle only within Ontario.

USTrucks, Trailers and Buses Operating In Ontario

Trucks or buses bearing US plates may operate in Ontario if the vehicle(s) were inspected, and a daily inspection report completed, in accordance with the daily inspection requirements of the US, or any province including Ontario, or in accordance with National Safety Code Standard 13, as of May 2008, which is published by the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators.

Where a daily inspection was completed in accordance with US requirements, the driver must carry and produce a daily inspection report that is not more than 24 hours old. Where a driver does not have access to the vehicle's daily inspection report, an inspection must conducted in accordance with Ontario rules. The driver must carry a US report that complies with US requirements and that is not more than 24 hours old, or complete an inspection report that complies with HTA Regulation 199/07 in Ontario.

NOTE: In the US, drivers are not required to do a trip inspection report if no defects are found during an inspection. This does not allow them to come to Ontario without a trip inspection report. If no report is completed in the US, then a driver must complete a report in compliance with Ontario regulations, NSC Standard 13 or another province in order to be in compliance in Ontario.

Ontario Trucks and Trailers and Buses Travelling in the U.S.

Ontario daily inspections and daily inspection reports are acceptable in the US

Periodic Mandatory Commercial Motor Vehicle Inspection (PMVI)

Periodic inspections are required for commercial motor vehicles, trailers and converter dollies, in order to reduce accidents due to mechanical defects and improve highway safety throughout Canada. The annual and semi-annual inspection requirements are the minimum under the law. Operators may find that, in order to properly maintain their vehicle’s on-road standards, additional inspections and maintenance are required.

Brief Overview of the Periodic Commercial Motor Vehicle Inspections

  • In Ontario, annual, semi-annual and safety-standards certificate inspections must be completed by a licensed motor vehicle inspection mechanic at an MTO-licensed inspection station.
  • Trucks, trailers and converter dollies require one inspection per year; an annual inspection is valid for 12 months.
  • Buses, school-purposes vehicles used for transporting six or more persons, and accessible vehicles require two inspections per year with different criteria:
    • An annual inspection can be completed every six months OR
    • An annual inspection can be followed by a semi-annual inspection six months later.
  • If a vehicle meets all of the requirements of an annual or semi-annual inspection, a sticker is applied to the vehicle, and a certificate and report is issued by the inspecting station.
  • Safety-standards certificates are required for: registering a rebuilt motor vehicle; transferring a used motor vehicle to a new owner as fit; registering a motor vehicle in Ontario that was previously registered in another province or country; and changing the status of a vehicle from unfit to fit.
  • If a vehicle meets all of the requirements of a safety-standards certificate Inspection, the certificate is issued, and the vehicle is deemed fit.

Out-of-Province Considerations

The legislation regarding periodic mandatory inspections varies between jurisdictions. Ontario’s inspections are accepted in other jurisdictions, and Ontario accepts inspections from other jurisdictions – provided they are recognized as meeting a similar standard.

However, the length of time that the inspection is valid varies between jurisdictions. Operators should check with the requirements of all the jurisdictions in which they intend to operate prior to doing business there.

Vehicles That are Subject to Periodic Mandatory Inspections

Annual Inspection

  • Trucks, trailers and converter dollies alone, or in combination, with a total gross weight, registered gross weight or manufacturer’s GVWR exceeding 4,500 kilograms

"Truck" includes, but is not limited to, truck tractors, straight trucks, pickup trucks, curb side/cube vans, trade vans/panel trucks.

"Trailer" includes, but is not limited to, boat, snowmobile, livestock and general-purpose utility trailers. "Trailer" does not include devices such as tar pots, portable welders, cement mixers, compressors and farm implements such as wagons and so on.

Annual Inspection and Semi-annual Inspection

  • Buses designed to transport 10 or more passengers, excluding those with a manufacturer’s gross vehicle weight rating of 4,500 kg or less, used exclusively for personal use
  • Accessible vehicles modified for the purpose of transporting people with disabilities, excluding those used only for personal purposes
  • School-purposes vehicles, operating under contract with a school board or other authority in charge of a school, being used for the transportation of six or more children or adults with a developmental disability

"Bus" includes, but is not limited to, any vehicle designed to transport 10 or more passengers, excluding the driver (for example, passenger van, limousine, motor coach, school bus and so on).

"Accessible vehicle" includes, but is not limited to, any vehicle that has been modified for transporting people with disabilities, whether or not the vehicle is also used for transporting those without disabilities (for example, a minivan, passenger van or taxi that has been modified for accessibility).

"School-purposes vehicle" includes, but is not limited to, any vehicle operating under contract with a school board or other authority in charge of a school for the transportation of six or more children or adults with a developmental disability.

Vehicles That Do Not Require Annual or Semi-Annual Inspections

  1. A motor vehicle commonly known as a recreational vehicle or a motor home, other than a motor vehicle:
    • Carrying commercial cargo or tools or equipment of a type normally used for commercial purposes
    • Carrying animals or non-commercial tools, equipment or vehicles that occupy one-half or more of its floor space
  2. A house trailer, other than a house trailer:
    • Owned or leased by an employer to house the employer’s employee
    • Carrying commercial cargo, tools or equipment of a type normally used for commercial purposes
    • Carrying animals or non-commercial tools, equipment or vehicles that occupy one-half or more of its floor space
    NOTE: A "house trailer” includes a cabin trailer, collapsible cabin trailer, tent trailer and camping trailer.
  3. Devices such as tar pots, portable welders, cement mixers, compressors and farm implements such as wagons and so on

  4. A Bus with a GVWR of 4,500 kilograms or less used exclusively for personal purposes

  5. An empty commercial vehicle operated by a manufacturer or vehicle dealer who has obtained a "special permit” for a 10-day period, or has a dealer or service plate as per the requirements under the HTA Regulation 628 (Vehicle Permits)

  6. Any unladen commercial motor vehicle or trailer operated under the authority of a service plate.

  7. Any laden commercial motor vehicle or trailer operated under the authority of a service plate being transported to an impound facility.

Inspection Criteria

Ontario – along with most Canadian jurisdictions – has adopted the National Safety Code 11, Part B, Periodic Commercial Motor Vehicle Inspections (NSC 11B), as the inspection criteria for annual, semi-annual and safety- standards certificate inspections for commercial vehicles, school-purposes vehicles and accessible vehicles.

HTA Regulation 611 (Safety Inspections) contain the requirements for annual, semi-annual and safety-standard certificates, along with modifications to the NSC 11B.

Each page of the National Standard is divided into two sections: the left side of the page lists the item and method of inspection; and the right side lists the corresponding rejection (pass/fail) criteria. Each part is organized into sections of the vehicle:

  1. Power Train
  2. Suspension
  3. Brakes
  4. Steering
  5. Instruments and Auxiliary Equipment
  6. Lamps
  7. Electrical System
  8. Body
  9. Tires and Wheels
  10. Couplers and Hitches

The National Standard identifies "hazardous conditions” for each section. Hazardous conditions shown in the National Standard are more serious vehicle conditions. In some provinces, inspection stations are authorized to take certain action to prevent the vehicle from returning to service until such conditions are repaired. These conditions have no unique status in Ontario.

A copy of the National Standard can be downloaded from the CCMTA website (Standard 11 Part B “Periodic Commercial Motor Vehicle Inspections”)

Ontario’s Modifications to the National Standard:

HTA Regulation 611 (Safety Inspections) Schedule 3 lists the modifications to the National Standard that must be applied in Ontario.

While the province is adopting NSC11B 2015 in almost its entirety there are four areas where the provincial rule is proposed to deviate from the national standard:

  1. The limitations on window tinting will only apply to vehicles manufactured after January 1, 2014 whereas the national standard has them applying retroactively;
  2. The limitations on the size of an external sun visor will not apply to any vehicles in Ontario,
  3. ABS requirements only apply to vehicles manufactured after April 1, 2000.
  4. When completing a semi-annual inspection for buses, accessible vehicles and school purposes vehicles, internal brake components will not be inspected; and.
  5. Buses, accessible vehicles and school purposes vehicles will not be permitted to use the Limited Brake Inspection protocol set out in the standard.

Use and Application of PMVI Stickers


Annual Inspection Sticker Semi-Annual Inspection Sticker

Once the vehicle has passed inspection at a motor vehicle inspection station, a sticker must be applied to the vehicle, to identify the successful completion of inspections and the expiry date of them. The inspection station must also provide inspection certificates and reports. The process is outlined below based on vehicle type:

Truck, Trailer and Converter Dolly

  • Annual inspection must be completed as per the requirements in NSC 11B and HTA Regulation 611.
  • A yellow annual inspection sticker is applied to the lower left-hand side of the windshield, or a conspicuous position on the left side of the truck cab, indicating the month and year the inspection was completed.
  • All other Ontario inspection stickers are covered or removed.
  • The inspection is valid for 12 months.
  • MVIS licensee must provide the owner/operator with a copy of the annual inspection certificate and the annual inspection report (see Record-Keeping for more details).

Buses, Accessible Vehicles and School-Purposes Vehicles

  • Annual inspection must be completed as per the requirements in NSC 11B and HTA Regulation 611.
  • A yellow annual inspection sticker must be applied to the lower right-hand side of the windshield, or a conspicuous position on the right side of the vehicle, indicating the month and year the inspection was completed.
  • All other Ontario annual inspection stickers must be covered or removed.
  • The inspection is valid for six months without a semi-annual inspection sticker, and 12 months with a semi-annual inspection sticker.
  • MVIS licensee must provide the operator with a copy of the annual inspection certificate and report (see Record-Keeping for more details).
  • Six months after the annual inspection, a semi-annual inspection must be done without the requirement of an internal brake inspection, or another annual inspection can be conducted.
  • If the semi-annual inspection is conducted, an orange semi-annual inspection sticker must be applied alongside the yellow annual inspection sticker, indicating the month and year the inspection was completed.
  • The semi-annual inspection sticker is valid for six months.
  • MVIS licensee must provide the operator with a copy of the semi-annual inspection certificate and the semi-annual inspection report (see Record-Keeping for more details).

PMVI Record-Keeping

HTA Regulation 601 (Motor Vehicle Inspection Stations), requires the following records to be kept for a period of one year after the date of inspection for MVIS stations, and two years after the date of inspection for the operator:

  1. Annual and semi-annual inspection certificates are produced in triplicate: one copy is to be kept with the vehicle; one copy for the vehicle file/operator; and one copy for the inspection station.
  2. Inspection Record – required for safety-standards certificates. One copy is to be kept by the MVIS; these reports must identify the vehicle inspected, a list of defects, recommended repairs and actual repairs.
  3. An Annual Inspection Report or Semi-Annual Inspection Report is required for annual and semi-annual inspections. Two copies are required: one to be kept by the MVIS; and one is provided to the owner/operator of the vehicle. These reports must contain:
    • Signature of mechanic and licensee
    • Date of inspection
    • Vehicle identification number
    • Annual or semi-annual inspection number
    • Information and measurements as required by the National Standard
    • List of defects, recommended repairs and actual repairs
  4. If applicable, there must be the proof-of-brake inspection document provided by the vehicle owner/operator confirming that an inspection has been completed by a MVIS-licensed mechanic within the timeline proscribed in the standard based on vehicle type and brake type. This is only required if the Limited Brake Inspection is completed as per Section 3 of NSC 11B.

Licensees may create their own Inspection Report, provided all of the requirements outlined in HTA Regulation 601 are met.

Inspection reports must be retained for a period of one year after the date of inspection; MTO accepts paper or electronic versions of the reports.

Other Vehicle Inspections

Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) Inspections

CVSA inspections are conducted by CVSA-certified MTO inspectors on vehicles and drivers at roadside or at the operator’s premises. These inspections may also be performed by members of the OPP, city and municipal law-enforcement personnel who are certified as CVSA inspectors, and by designated staff from MTO’s Carrier Safety and Enforcement Branch.

The inspections are conducted in accordance with the criteria outlined by the CVSA on the roadside, or by arrangement with the operator at theirs or other designated premises. Some inspections are initiated by CVSA inspectors in response to complaints about the condition of the operator’s vehicle or vehicles. Bus inspections are arranged as part of the ministry’s Bus Information Tracking System program. Operators are encouraged to take a proactive approach toward vehicle maintenance. Remember that CVSA inspection reports can be used to gauge the effectiveness of the operator’s preventive-maintenance program.

Levels of Inspection

There are five levels of inspection used in Ontario:

Level 1 – Complete vehicle inspection with the driver

Level 2 – Driver and vehicle walk-around

Level 3 – Driver-only inspection

Level 4 – Special inspection of one or more components

Level 5 – Complete vehicle inspection without a driver (usually completed at the operator’s shop or yard)

When there are no violations, the vehicle "passes inspection.” When a vehicle receives a "pass” in a Level 1 or Level 5 inspection, a CVSA decal is applied.

This decal indicates that the vehicle passed inspection, and is valid for the current month and the following two months. During this time, further CVSA inspections are not typically required, unless there is an observed safety concern.

Some defects will result in a violation that requires attention. The driver is given a copy of the inspection report. The vehicle must be repaired prior to its next dispatch. The operator may be required to send repair verification to the officer within a specified time period.

When serious defects are found, the vehicle and/or the driver will be placed out of service. The vehicle and/or the driver will not be allowed back on the road until the out-of-service items have been addressed adequately. If repairs can be carried out on-site, the vehicle may be re-inspected quickly and, if in compliance, allowed back in service.

If on-site repairs are not possible, then the vehicle may be towed or transported to a repair site. Licence plates may be removed when vehicles are in this condition. In any case, the vehicle must be repaired as required. The operator may be required to have a complete safety-standards certificate inspection conducted to obtain new plates. Or the operator may just be required to report back to the inspecting officer confirming that the repair has been done as directed within the specified time period.

An officer may prohibit a driver from operating a commercial motor vehicle for a variety of reasons, including exceeding the hours of service, as specified by federal or provincial legislation. The driver may proceed after the necessary rest periods have been met.

Copies of CVSA inspection reports must be kept in the office vehicle file for a period of two years.

Specific details on the CVSA inspection program and its out-of-service criteria may be obtained from:

Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance
6303 Ivy Lane, Suite 310
Greenbelt, MD 20770-6319
Website: www.cvsa.org

Safety-Standards Certificates

Safety-standards certificates are required when:

  • registering a rebuilt motor vehicle
  • transferring a used motor vehicle to a new owner as fit
  • registering a motor vehicle in Ontario that was previously registered in another province or country
  • changing the status of a vehicle from unfit to fit

The National Safety Code Standard 11B inspection criteria will be used for trucks, trailers, buses, accessible vehicles and school-purposes vehicles as described previously. Vehicles that do not meet these definitions are inspected as per schedules 1 and 2 in HTA Regulation 610 (Safety Inspections).

Bus Inspections

Buses are subject to on-site inspections completed by MTO enforcement officers.  These inspections take place at the origin/destination, or at bus terminals, to ensure that the vehicles are mechanically fit and that the bus operator has met the legislated obligations such as annual and semi-annual inspections.  These inspections are scheduled using a risk-based approach considering factors such as age, size of the fleet and past safety performance.

Vehicle Record-Keeping

Records to Be Retained

Operators are required to keep the following records for each truck, bus, accessible vehicle, school-purposes vehicle, towed trailer and converter dolly that is subject to the requirements outlined previously:

  • Identification records for the vehicle, including
    • The vehicle’s unit number, if any
    • The vehicle’s year and make
    • The vehicle’s vehicle identification number
    • If the vehicle is not owned by the operator, the name of the person who supplies it, and the first and last dates when the vehicle was operated by the current operator
  • A record of the inspections and maintenance of, and repairs to, the vehicle, including
    • The nature of the inspections, maintenance and repairs
    • The name of the person who conducted each inspection and performed each maintenance or repair
    • If an inspection, maintenance or repair were performed by someone other than the operator or a person employed by the operator, the invoice or other record provided by that person who performed it
    • If a part were purchased and used in maintenance or in a repair, the invoice or receipt for the part (see note)
    • If the vehicle has an odometer, the odometer reading of the vehicle at the end of the inspection, maintenance or repair

NOTE:

  • Invoices and receipts for the purchase of bulk parts must be maintained until the inventory has been depleted, or at least two years has passed, whichever occurs last.
    • Parts from all purchases, including bulk purchases, must be inventoried out on repair documents.
    • It is not a requirement that a repair document shows an invoice or receipt number.
    • It is not necessary to keep invoices within maintenance files. Invoices may be maintained within accounts payable, provided the operator can supply the invoices to an auditor at time of an audit.
    • The types and frequency must be shown under the operator’s system of periodic inspections and maintenance.
    • A record must be kept of any axle or suspension modifications of the vehicle that affect the manufacturer’s GVWR or gross axle-weight rating.
    • Copies must be retained of safety-standards certificates and annual inspection certificates issued for the vehicle, as well as copies of equivalent documents from other jurisdictions.
    • Copies must also be kept of inspection notices, reports and appearance notices issued by an enforcement officer or government official of another jurisdiction.

Retention Period for Records

When a report lists a defect that was repaired without the operator creating a separate repair order, the repair and any parts used must be noted in the report. In this case, the report becomes a maintenance record, and must be retained for two years.

This applies whether or not the report contains a separate "certification of repairs" section.

Retention Location for Records

Records are kept at the operator’s principal place of business or another terminal, or at the business address of the operator.

Where a record or document is in electronic format that would allow a printed copy to be generated, it may be stored at any location, as long as it can be accessed readily by the operator from the principal place of business.

Electronic Records

Any record or document that is required to be created, kept or surrendered may be done so in electronic format. An electronic record or document does not require a signature.

Operators who keep records and documents in electronic format must be capable of printing a copy.

Internal Evaluation of an Operator's Preventive-Maintenance Program

The preventive-maintenance program should be evaluated periodically by the operator to ensure that it is effective, and that vehicles are kept in safe operating condition at all times. Several sources of information can be used to measure the effectiveness of the program.

Results of CVSA inspections measure the effectiveness of daily inspections. Analysis of CVSA reports, annual inspection reports and carrier profiles may identify the source of problems, such as the quality of internal inspections, mechanical work and driver habits.

Some steps may then be taken to fix the source of these problems, by making changes to the preventive-maintenance program, providing additional training, more detailed monitoring and/or taking disciplinary action. The result will be fewer collisions and less risk to the driver and the public. Operators will also save money.

The operator’s CVOR Level II Carrier Abstract, which lists all violations, convictions, CVSA inspections and collisions, can be obtained from the Ontario Ministry of Transportation.

List of Appendices

  1. Schedule 1 of Regulation 199/07 (truck, tractors and trailers)
  2. Schedule 2 of Regulation 199/07 (buses and trailers drawn by buses)
  3. Schedule 3 of Regulation 199/07 (motor coaches)
  4. Schedule 4 of Regulation 199/07 (under vehicle inspection of motor coaches)
  5. Schedule 5 of Regulation 199/07 (school-purposes buses)
  6. Schedule 6 of Regulation 199/07 (school-purposes vehicles)
  7. Samples of single-day reports and multi-day report books
  8. Sample under-vehicle inspection report
  9. Sample of certificate of repairs

Appendix A Daily Inspection Schedules 1 to 6

Copy of Regulated Inspection Schedules, Three Column Format:

The following Schedules are directly from the Regulation and have not been modified.

Please note that section 19 of Part VI of Regulation 199/07 provides "notes to the schedules". It is not a requirement that these "notes to the schedules" be included with or attached to the schedules. Numbers within brackets, i.e. (1), (12) etc. found within the schedules are a reference to the "notes to the schedules" and are not required to be in the schedules.

Schedule 1,

Daily inspection of trucks, tractors and trailers

Systems and Components Minor Defects Major Defects

Part 1. Air Brake System

  1. audible air leak.
  2. slow air pressure build-up rate.
  1. pushrod stroke of any brake exceeds the adjustment limit.(1)
  2. air loss rate exceeds prescribed limit.(2)
  3. inoperative towing vehicle (tractor) protection system.
  4. low air warning system fails or system is activated.
  5. inoperative service, parking or emergency brake.

Part 2. Cab

  1. occupant compartment door fails to open.
  1. Any cab or sleeper door fails to close securely.

Part 3. Cargo Securement

  1. insecure or improper load covering.
  1. insecure cargo.
  2. absence, failure, malfunction or deterioration of required cargo securement device or load covering.(3)

Part 4. Coupling Devices

  1. coupler or mounting has loose or missing fastener.
  1. coupler is insecure or movement exceeds prescribed limit.(4)
  2. coupling or locking mechanism is damaged or fails to lock.
  3. defective, incorrect or missing safety chain or cable.

Part 5. Dangerous Goods

  1. dangerous goods requirements not met.(5)

Part 6. Driver Controls

  1. accelerator pedal, clutch, gauges, audible and visual indicators or instruments fail to function properly.

Part 7. Driver Seat

  1. seat is damaged or fails to remain in set position.
  1. seatbelt or tether belt is insecure, missing or malfunctions.

Part 8. Electric Brake System

  1. loose or insecure wiring or electrical connection.
  1. inoperative breakaway device.
  2. inoperative brake.

Part 9. Emergency Equipment and Safety Devices

  1. emergency equipment is missing, damaged or defective.

Part 10. Exhaust System

  1. exhaust leak, except as described in next column
  1. leak that causes exhaust gas to enter the occupant compartment.

Part 11. Frame and Cargo Body

  1. damaged frame or cargo body.
  1. visibly shifted, cracked, collapsing or sagging frame member.

Part 12. Fuel System

  1. missing fuel tank cap.
  1. insecure fuel tank.
  2. dripping fuel leak.

Part 13. General

  1. serious damage or deterioration that is noticeable and may affect the vehicle’s safe operation.

Part 14. Glass and Mirrors

  1. required mirror(6) or window glass fails to provide the required view(7) to the driver as a result of being cracked, broken, damaged, missing or maladjusted.
  2. required mirror(6) or glass has broken or damaged attachments onto vehicle body.

Part 15. Heater / Defroster

  1. control or system failure.
  1. defroster fails to provide unobstructed view through the windshield.

Part 16. Horn

  1. vehicle has no operative horn.

Part 17. Hydraulic Brake System

  1. brake fluid level is below indicated minimum level.
  1. brake boost or power assist is not operative.
  2. brake fluid leak.
  3. brake pedal fade or insufficient brake pedal reserve.
  4. activated (other than anti-lock braking system) warning device.
  5. brake fluid reservoir is less than 1/4 full.
  6. parking brake is inoperative.

Part 18. Lamps and Reflectors

  1. required lamp does not function as intended.(8)
  2. required reflector is missing or partially missing.(9)

When use of lamps is required:

  1. failure of both low-beam headlamps.
  2. failure of both rearmost tail lamps.

At all times:

  1. failure of a rearmost turn-indicator lamp.
  2. failure of both rearmost brake lamps.

Part 19. Steering

  1. steering wheel lash (free-play) is greater than normal.
  1. steering wheel is insecure, or does not respond normally.
  2. steering wheel lash (free-play) exceeds prescribed limit.(10)

Part 20. Suspension System

  1. air leak in air suspension system.
  2. a broken spring leaf.
  3. suspension fastener is loose, missing or broken.
  1. damaged (patched, cut, bruised, cracked to braid or deflated) air bag.
  2. cracked or broken main spring leaf or more than one broken spring leaf.
  3. part of spring leaf or suspension is missing, shifted out of place or is in contact with another vehicle component.
  4. loose U-bolt.

Part 21. Tires

  1. damaged tread or sidewall of tire.
  2. tire leaking, if leak cannot be heard.
  1. flat tire. Tire leaking, if leak can be felt or heard
  2. tire tread depth is less than wear limit.(11)
  3. tire is in contact with another tire or any vehicle component other than mud-flap.
  4. tire is marked "Not for highway use”.
  5. tire has exposed cords in the tread or outer sidewall area

Part 22. Wheels, Hubs and Fasteners

  1. hub oil below minimum level (when fitted with sight glass).
  2. leaking wheel seal.
  1. wheel has loose, missing or ineffective fastener.
  2. damaged, cracked or broken wheel, rim or attaching part.
  3. evidence of imminent wheel, hub or bearing failure.

Part 23. Windshield Wiper / Washer

  1. control or system malfunction.
  2. wiper blade is damaged, missing or fails to adequately clear driver’s field of vision.

When use of wipers or washer is required:

  1. wiper or washer fails to adequately clear driver’s field of vision in area swept by driver’s side wiper.

Schedule 2,

Daily inspection of buses and of trailers drawn by buses

Systems and Components Minor Defects Major Defects

Part 1. Accessibility Devices

Accessibility device may not be used if:

  1. alarm fails to operate.
  2. equipment malfunctions.
  3. interlock system malfunctions.
  1. vehicle fails to return to normal level after kneeling.
  2. extendable lift, ramp or other passenger-loading device fails to retract.

Part 2. Air Brake System

  1. audible air leak.
  2. slow air pressure build-up rate.
  1. pushrod stroke of any brake exceeds the adjustment limit.(1)
  2. air loss rate exceeds prescribed limit.(2)
  3. inoperative towing vehicle (tractor) protection system.
  4. low air warning system fails or system is activated.
  5. inoperative service, parking or emergency brake.

Part 3. Cargo Securement

  1. insecure or improper load covering.
  1. insecure cargo.
  2. absence, failure, malfunction or deterioration of required cargo securement device or load covering.(3)

Part 4. Coupling Devices

  1. coupler or mounting has loose or missing fastener.
  1. coupler is insecure or movement exceeds prescribed limit.(4)
  2. coupling or locking mechanism is damaged or fails to lock.
  3. defective, incorrect or missing safety chain or cable.

Part 5. Dangerous Goods

  1. dangerous goods requirements not met.(5)

Part 6. Doors and Emergency Exits

  1. door, window or hatch fails to open or close securely.
  2. alarm inoperative.

When carrying passengers:

  1. required emergency exit fails to function as intended.(12)

Part 7. Driver Controls

  1. accelerator pedal, clutch, gauges, audible and visual indicators or instruments fail to function properly.

When carrying passengers:

  1. accelerator sticking and engine fails to return to idle.

Part 8. Driver Seat

  1. seat is damaged or fails to remain in set position.
  1. seatbelt or tether belt is insecure, missing or malfunctions.

Part 9. Electric Brake System

  1. loose or insecure wiring or electrical connection.
  1. inoperative breakaway device.
  2. inoperative brake.

Part 10. Emergency Equipment and Safety Devices

  1. emergency equipment is missing, damaged or defective.

Part 11. Exhaust System

  1. exhaust leak, except as described in next column
  1. leak that causes exhaust gas to enter the occupant compartment.

Part 12. Exterior Body and Frame

  1. insecure or missing body parts.
  2. insecure or missing compartment door.
  3. damaged frame or body.
  1. visibly shifted, cracked, collapsing or sagging frame member.

Part 13. Fuel System

  1. missing fuel tank cap.
  2. insecure fuel tank.
  3. dripping fuel leak.

Part 14. General

  1. serious damage or deterioration that is noticeable and may affect the vehicle's safe operation.

Part 15. Glass and Mirrors

  1. required mirror(6) or window glass fails to provide the required view(7) to the driver as a result of being cracked, broken, damaged, missing or maladjusted.
  2. required mirror(6) or glass has broken or damaged attachments onto vehicle body.

When carrying passengers:

  1. driver's view of the road is obstructed in the area swept by the windshield wipers.

Part 16. Heater / Defroster

  1. control or system failure.
  1. defroster fails to provide unobstructed view through the windshield.

Part 17. Horn

  1. vehicle has no operative horn.

Part 18. Hydraulic Brake System

  1. brake fluid level is below indicated minimum level.
  1. brake boost or power assist is not operative.
  2. brake fluid leak.
  3. brake pedal fade or insufficient brake pedal reserve.
  4. activated (other than anti-lock braking system) warning device.
  5. brake fluid reservoir is less than 1/4 full.
  6. parking brake is inoperative.

Part 19. Lamps and Reflectors

  1. required interior lamp does not function as intended.(8)
  2. required reflector is missing or partially missing.(9)
  3. passenger safety or access lamp does not function.

When use of lamps is required:

  1. failure of both low-beam headlamps.
  2. failure of both rearmost tail lamps.

At all times:

  1. failure of a rearmost turn-indicator lamp.
  2. failure of both rearmost brake lamps.

Part 20. Passenger Compartment

  1. stanchion padding is damaged.
  2. damaged steps or floor.
  3. insecure or damaged overhead luggage rack or compartment.
  4. malfunction or absence of required passenger or mobility device restraints.(14)
  5. passenger seat is insecure.

When affected position is occupied:

  1. malfunction or absence of required passenger or mobility device restraints.(14)
  2. passenger seat is insecure.

Part 21. Steering

  1. steering wheel lash (free-play) is greater than normal.
  1. steering wheel is insecure, or does not respond normally.
  2. steering wheel lash (free-play) exceeds prescribed limit.(10)

Part 22. Suspension System

  1. air leak in air suspension system.
  2. a broken spring leaf.
  3. suspension fastener is loose, missing or broken.
  1. damaged (patched, cut, bruised, cracked to braid or deflated) air bag.
  2. cracked or broken main spring leaf or more than one broken spring leaf.
  3. part of spring leaf or suspension is missing, shifted out of place or is in contact with another vehicle component.
  4. loose U-bolt.

Part 23. Tires

  1. damaged tread or sidewall of tire.
  2. tire leaking.
  1. flat tire. Tire leaking, if leak can be felt or heard
  2. tire tread depth is less than wear limit.(11)
  3. tire is in contact with another tire or any vehicle component other than mud-flap.
  4. tire is marked "Not for highway use".
  5. tire has exposed cords in the tread or outer sidewall area

Part 24. Wheels, Hubs and Fasteners

  1. hub oil below minimum level (when fitted with sight glass).
  2. leaking wheel seal.
  1. wheel has loose, missing or ineffective fastener.
  2. damaged, cracked or broken wheel, rim or attaching part.
  3. evidence of imminent wheel, hub or bearing failure.

Part 25. Windshield Wiper / Washer

  1. control or system malfunction.
  2. wiper blade is damaged, missing or fails to adequately clear driver's field of vision.

When use of wipers or washer is required:

  1. wiper or washer fails to adequately clear driver's field of vision in area swept by driver's side wiper.


Schedule 3,

Daily inspection of inter-city buses

Systems and Components Minor Defects Major Defects

Part 1. Accessibility Devices

Accessibility device may not be used if:

  1. alarm fails to operate.
  2. equipment malfunctions.
  3. interlock system malfunctions.
  1. vehicle fails to return to normal level after kneeling.
  2. extendable lift, ramp or other passenger-loading device fails to retract.

Part 2. Air Brake System

  1. audible air leak.
  2. slow air pressure build-up rate.
  1. there is any indication of a brake adjustment problem.
  2. air loss rate exceeds prescribed limit.(2)
  3. inoperative towing vehicle (tractor) protection system.
  4. low air warning system fails or system is activated.
  5. inoperative service, parking or emergency brake.

Part 3. Coupling Devices

  1. coupler or mounting has loose or missing fastener.
  1. coupler is insecure or movement exceeds prescribed limit.(4)
  2. coupling or locking mechanism is damaged or fails to lock.
  3. defective, incorrect or missing safety chain or cable.

Part 4. Dangerous Goods

  1. dangerous goods requirements not met.(5)

Part 5. Doors and Emergency Exits

  1. door, window or hatch fails to open or close securely.
  2. alarm inoperative.

When carrying passengers:

  1. required emergency exit fails to function as intended.(12)

Part 6. Driver Controls

  1. accelerator pedal, clutch, gauges, audible and visual indicators or instruments fail to function properly.

When carrying passengers:

  1. accelerator sticking and engine fails to return to idle.

Part 7. Driver Seat

  1. seat is damaged or fails to remain in set position.
  1. seatbelt or tether belt is insecure, missing or malfunctions.

Part 8. Emergency Equipment and Safety Devices

  1. emergency equipment is missing, damaged or defective.

Part 9. Exhaust System

  1. exhaust leak, except as described next column
  1. leak that causes exhaust gas to enter the occupant compartment.

Part 10. Exterior Body

  1. insecure or missing body parts.
  2. insecure or missing compartment door.

Part 11. Fuel System

  1. missing fuel tank cap.
  2. insecure fuel tank.
  3. dripping fuel leak.

Part 12. General

  1. serious damage or deterioration that is noticeable and may affect the vehicle's safe operation.

Part 13. Glass and Mirrors

  1. required mirror(6) or window glass fails to provide the required view(7) to the driver as a result of being cracked, broken, damaged, missing or maladjusted.
  2. required mirror(6) or glass has broken or damaged attachments onto vehicle body.

When carrying passengers:

  1. driver's view of the road is obstructed in the area swept by the windshield wipers.

Part 14. Heater / Defroster

  1. control or system failure.
  1. defroster fails to provide unobstructed view through the windshield.

Part 15. Horn

  1. vehicle has no operative horn.

Part 16. Lamps and Reflectors

  1. required interior lamp does not function as intended.(13)
  2. required reflector is missing or partially missing.(9)
  3. passenger safety or access lamp does not function.

When use of lamps is required:

  1. failure of both low-beam headlamps.
  2. failure of both rearmost tail lamps.

At all times:

  1. failure of a rearmost turn-indicator lamp.
  2. failure of both rearmost brake lamps.

Part 17. Passenger Compartment

  1. stanchion padding is damaged.
  2. damaged steps or floor.
  3. insecure or damaged overhead luggage rack or compartment.
  4. malfunction or absence of required passenger or mobility device restraints.(14)
  5. passenger seat is insecure.

When affected position is occupied:

  1. malfunction or absence of required passenger or mobility device restraints.(14)
  2. passenger seat is insecure.

Part 18. Suspension System

  1. air leak in air suspension system.
  1. damaged (patched, cut, bruised, cracked to braid or deflated) air bag.

Part 19. Steering

  1. steering wheel lash (free-play) is greater than normal.
  1. steering wheel is insecure, or does not respond normally.
  2. steering wheel lash (free-play) exceeds prescribed limit.(10)

Part 20. Tires

  1. damaged tread or sidewall of tire.
  2. tire leaking, if leak cannot be heard
  1. flat tire. Tire leaking, if leak can be felt or heard
  2. tire tread depth is less than wear limit.(11)
  3. tire is in contact with another tire or any vehicle component other than mud-flap.
  4. tire is marked "Not for highway use".
  5. tire has exposed cords in the tread or outer sidewall area

Part 21. Wheels, Hubs and Fasteners

  1. hub oil below minimum level (when fitted with sight glass).
  2. leaking wheel seal.
  1. wheel has loose, missing or ineffective fastener.
  2. damaged, cracked or broken wheel, rim or attaching part.
  3. evidence of imminent wheel, hub or bearing failure.

Part 22. Windshield Wiper / Washer

  1. control or system malfunction.
  2. wiper blade is damaged, missing or fails to adequately clear driver's field of vision.

When use of wipers or washer is required:

  1. wiper or washer fails to adequately clear driver's field of vision in area swept by driver's side wiper.

Schedule 4,

Under-Vehicle Inter-City Bus Inspections

Systems and Components Defects

Part 1. Air Brake System

  1. audible air leak.
  2. brake pushrod stroke is beyond the adjustment limit.(1)
  3. clearance between disc brake pads and rotor exceeds manufacturer's specified limit.
  4. clearance between a brake caliper piston and the disc pad backing plate exceeds manufacturer's specified limit.
  5. wedge brake shoe movement exceeds manufacturer's specified limit.
  6. excessive discharge of fluids from air reservoir.
  7. air compressor, mounts or attachments damaged or defective.
  8. compressor drive-belt loose or damaged.
  9. air line or fitting damaged or insecure.
  10. air tank defective, damaged or insecure.
  11. air tank drain or moisture ejector device inoperable.
  12. brake chamber, brake linkage or other brake component is defective, damaged or insecure.
  13. spring brake is broken or malfunctions.
  14. inoperative service, parking or emergency brake.

Part 2. Exhaust System

  1. exhaust leak.
  2. exhaust system component insecure, damaged or perforated.

Part 3. Frame and Underbody

  1. any frame member or fastener is damaged, cracked or insecure.
  2. any component mount is damaged or insecure.

Part 4. Fuel System

  1. fuel leak.
  2. insecure fuel tanks, fuel tank mounts or guards.
  3. fuel line or fitting damaged or insecure.

Part 5. Steering

  1. steering linkage is damaged or insecure.
  2. power steering fluid is leaking, contaminated or low.
  3. power steering component damaged or insecure.

Part 6. Suspension System

  1. air leak or malfunction of air suspension system or component.
  2. damage or deterioration of any suspension component including:
    1. spring and air bag,
    2. axle or frame attaching component,
    3. axle supporting or aligning component,
    4. suspension or component fastener, and
    5. shock absorber or attachments.

Part 7. Tires

  1. tire inflation less than required.(15)
  2. tire tread is less than wear limit.(11)
  3. damage to tread or sidewall of tire.
  4. retread or rebuilt tire is used on front axle.

Part 8. Wheels and Fasteners

  1. loose, missing, damaged or ineffective wheel fastener.
  2. damaged wheel or wheel component.

Schedule 5,

Daily inspection of school purposes buses

Systems and Components Minor Defects Major Defects

Part 1. Air Brake System

  1. audible air leak.
  2. slow air pressure build-up rate.
  1. brake is beyond its adjustment limit.(1)
  2. air loss rate exceeds prescribed limit.(2)
  3. low air warning system fails or system is activated.
  4. inoperative service, parking or emergency brake.

Part 2. Alternating Overhead Lamps

  1. a lamp is missing or inoperative.
  2. lamps do not alternate.
  3. a lamp is not of the proper colour.

When use of lamp is required:

  1. a lamp is missing or inoperative.
  2. lamps do not alternate.
  3. a lamp is not of the proper colour.

Part 3. Doors and Windows, other than Emergency Exits

  1. a window or door fails to open or close securely.

When carrying passengers:

  1. door fails to open or close securely.

At all times:

  1. window fails to provide the required view(16) to the driver as a result of being cracked, broken, damaged, missing, maladjusted, clouded or fogged.

Part 4. Driver Controls

  1. accelerator pedal, clutch, gauges, audible and visual indicators or instruments fail to function properly.
  1. accelerator sticking and engine fails to return to idle.

Part 5. Emergency Exits

  1. required alarm is inoperative.(17)

When carrying passengers:

  1. window fails to open from inside or close securely.
  2. door fails to open freely from inside and outside.
  3. a required door alarm is inoperative.(17)

Part 6. Emergency Flares, Lamps or Reflectors

  1. missing or insecure.

Part 7. Exhaust System

  1. exhaust leak, except as described next column
  1. leak that causes exhaust gas to enter the occupant compartment.

Part 8. Exterior Body and Frame

  1. insecure or missing body parts.
  2. insecure or missing compartment door.
  3. damaged frame or body.
  1. one or more visibly shifted, cracked, collapsing or sagging frame member.

Part 9. Fire Extinguisher

  1. fire extinguisher missing.
  2. the gauge on any required fire extinguisher indicates an empty condition or a complete lack of pressure.(18)
  3. fire extinguisher is not securely mounted or stored in a manner that prevents the extinguisher from being a projectile object.

When carrying passengers:

  1. fire extinguisher missing.
  2. the gauge on any required fire extinguisher indicates an empty condition or a complete lack of pressure.(18)

Part 10. First Aid Kit

  1. required first aid kit is missing.(19)
  2. kit is incomplete.

When carrying passengers:

  1. required first aid kit is missing.(19)

Part 11. Fuel System

  1. missing fuel tank cap.
  2. insecure fuel tank.
  3. dripping fuel leak.

Part 12. General

  1. serious damage or deterioration that is noticeable and may affect the vehicle's safe operation.

Part 13. Heater / Defroster

  1. control or system failure.
  1. defroster fails to provide an unobstructed view through the windshield and through the side windows to the left and right of the driver's seat.

Part 14. Horn

  1. no operative horn.

Part 15. Hydraulic Brake System

  1. brake fluid level is below indicated minimum level.
  1. brake boost or power assist is not operative.
  2. brake fluid leak.
  3. brake pedal fade or insufficient brake pedal reserve.
  4. activated (other than anti-lock braking system) warning device.
  5. brake fluid reservoir is less than 1/4 full.
  6. inoperative service brake or ineffective parking brake.

Part 16. Inspection Stickers

  1. a required sticker is missing, unreadable or is invalid.(20)

Part 17. Lamps and Reflectors

  1. required interior or exterior lamp does not operate or function as intended.(21)
  2. required reflector is missing or partially missing.(9)

At all times:

  1. vehicle does not have at least one left and one right rear turn signal lamp.
  2. vehicle does not have at least one brake lamp.

When use of lamps is required:

  1. vehicle does not have at least one low-beam headlamp.
  2. vehicle does not have at least one tail lamp.

Part 18. Mirrors

  1. a mirror fails to provide the required view to the driver as a result of being cracked, damaged or maladjusted.(22)
  2. a mirror has broken or damaged attachments onto vehicle body.
  1. a mirror is missing or broken.
  2. the glass surface of a mirror has an aggregate non-reflective area exceeding 6.5 square centimetres (1 sq in).

Part 19. Mobility Device Lift

  1. extendable lift, ramp or other passenger-loading device fails to retract.

Part 20. Mobility Device Ramp

  1. ramp will not attach securely to vehicle when positioned to load or unload passengers in mobility devices or will not remain in the stored position.
  2. ramp structure is weak, damaged or worn.

Part 21. Passenger Compartment

  1. stanchion padding is damaged.
  2. damaged steps or floor.
  3. insecure or damaged overhead luggage rack or compartment.

Part 22. Pedestrian-Student Safety Crossing Arm

  1. the arm is missing or fails to function as intended.

Part 23. Seats and Seat Belts

  1. driver's seat fails to remain in set position.
  2. required restraint system or component of required restraint system is missing.(23)
  3. restraint system or component of restraint system is defective.
  4. seat is insecure.
  5. restraint system for passenger in mobility device or mobility device restrain system or component of either system is missing or defective.

When affected position is occupied:

  1. required restraint system or component of restraint system is missing.(23)
  2. restraint system or component of restraint system is defective.
  3. seat is insecure.

When affected position is occupied with a mobility device or a passenger in a mobility device:

  1. passenger restraint system, mobility device restraint system or component of either system is missing or defective.

When affected position or position behind it is occupied:

  1. passenger seat or passenger protection barrier is insecure.
  2. seat back or passenger protection barrier padding is missing, partially missing or has shifted from position so as not to be effective.

Part 24. Steering

  1. steering wheel lash (free-play) is greater than normal.
  1. steering wheel is insecure, or does not respond normally.
  2. steering wheel lash (free-play) exceeds prescribed limit.(10)

Part 25. Stop Arm

  1. stop arm or stop sign is missing.
  2. stop arm or stop sign is damaged so as to significantly affect visibility.
  3. will not extend fully or stay fully extended.
  4. either light on stop arm is inoperative or lights do not alternate or lights are not red.

When use of stop arm or stop sign is required:

  1. stop arm or stop sign is missing.
  2. stop arm or stop sign is damaged so as to significantly affect visibility.
  3. will not extend fully or stay fully extended.
  4. either light on stop arm is inoperative or lights do not alternate or lights are not red.

Part 26. Suspension System

  1. air leak in air suspension system.
  2. one broken spring leaf.
  3. suspension fastener is loose, missing or broken.
  1. damaged (patched, cut, bruised, cracked to braid or deflated) air bag.
  2. cracked or broken main spring leaf or more than one broken spring leaf.
  3. part of spring leaf or suspension is missing, shifted out of place or is in contact with another vehicle component.
  4. loose U-bolt.
  5. broken spring on other than a leaf spring system.

Part 27. Tires

  1. damaged tread or sidewall of tire.
  2. tire leaking, if leak cannot be heard
  1. flat tire. Tire leaking, if leak can be felt or heard
  2. tire tread depth is less than wear limit.(11)
  3. tire is in contact with another tire or any vehicle component other than mud-flap.
  4. tire is marked "Not for highway use".
  5. tire has exposed cords in the tread or outer sidewall area

Part 28. Wheels, Hubs, Fasteners and Bearings

  1. hub oil below minimum level (when fitted with sight glass).
  2. leaking wheel seal.
  1. wheel has loose, missing or ineffective fastener.
  2. damaged, cracked or broken wheel, rim or attaching part.
  3. evidence of imminent wheel, hub or bearing failure.

Part 29. Windshield Wiper / Washer

  1. control or system malfunction.
  2. wiper blade is damaged, missing or ineffective.
  3. wiper or washer fails to adequately clear the windshield in the areas swept by both wipers.

When use of wipers or washer is required:

  1. a. control or system malfunction.
  2. wiper is damaged, missing or ineffective.
  3. wiper or washer fails to adequately clear the windshield in the areas swept by both wipers.

Schedule 6,

Daily inspection of school purposes vehicles

Systems and Components Minor Defects Major Defects

Part 1. Doors and Windows

  1. window or door fails to open or close securely.

When carrying passengers:

  1. door fails to open or close securely.

At all times:

  1. window fails to provide the required view(24) to the driver as a result of being cracked, broken, damaged, missing, maladjusted, clouded or fogged.

Part 2. Driver Controls

  1. accelerator pedal, clutch, gauges, audible and visual indicators or instruments fail to function properly.
  1. accelerator sticking and engine fails to return to idle.

Part 3. Exhaust System

  1. exhaust leak, except as described next column
  1. leak that causes exhaust gas to enter the occupant compartment.

Part 4. Exterior Body and Frame

  1. insecure or missing body parts.
  2. damaged frame or body.
  1. one or more visibly shifted, cracked, collapsing or sagging frame member.

Part 5. Fuel System

  1. missing fuel tank cap.
  2. insecure fuel tank.
  3. dripping fuel leak.

Part 6. General

  1. serious damage or deterioration that is noticeable and may affect the vehicle's safe operation.

Part 7. Heater / Defroster

  1. control or system failure.
  1. defroster fails to provide unobstructed view through the windshield and through the side windows to left and right of driver's seat.

Part 8. Horn

  1. no operative horn.

Part 9. Hydraulic Brake System

  1. brake fluid level is below indicated minimum level.
  1. brake boost or power assist is not operative.
  2. brake fluid leak.
  3. brake pedal fade or insufficient brake pedal reserve.
  4. activated (other than anti-lock braking system) warning device.
  5. brake fluid reservoir is less than 1/4 full.
  6. inoperative service or parking brake.

Part 10. Inspection Stickers

  1. a required sticker is missing, unreadable or invalid.(20)

Part 11. Lamps

  1. required exterior lamp does not operate or function as intended.(8)

At all times:

  1. does not have at least one left and one right rear turn signal lamp.

When use of lamps is required:

  1. does not have at least one low-beam headlamp.
  2. does not have at least one tail lamp.

Part 12. Mirrors

  1. a mirror fails to provide the required view(24) to the driver as a result of being cracked, broken, damaged, missing or maladjusted.
  2. a mirror has broken or damaged attachments onto vehicle body.
  1. mirror is missing or broken.
  2. the glass surface of a mirror has an aggregate non-reflective area exceeding 6.5 square centimetres (1 sq in).

Part 13. Mobility Device Lift





  1. extendable lift, ramp or other passenger-loading device fails to retract.

Part 14. Mobility Device Ramp

  1. ramp will not attach securely to vehicle when positioned to load or unload passengers in mobility devices, or will not remain in the stored position.
  2. ramp structure is weak, damaged or worn.

Part 15. Seats and Seat Belts

  1. driver's seat fails to remain in set position.
  2. required restraint system or component of required restraint system is missing.(14)
  3. restraint system or component of restraint system is defective.
  4. seat is insecure
  5. restraint system for passenger in mobility device or mobility device restraint system or component of either system is missing or defective.

When affected position is occupied:

  1. required restraint system or component of required system is missing.(14)
  2. restraint system or component of restraint system is defective.
  3. seat is insecure.

When affected position is occupied with a mobility device or a passenger in a mobility device:

  1. passenger restraint system, mobility device restraint system or component of either system is missing or defective.

Part 16. Steering

  1. steering wheel lash (free-play) is greater than normal.
  1. steering wheel is insecure, or does not respond normally.
  2. steering wheel lash (free-play) exceeds prescribed limit.(10)

Part 17. Suspension System

  1. air leak in air suspension system.
  2. one broken spring leaf.
  3. suspension fastener is loose, missing or broken.
  1. damaged or deflated air bag.
  2. cracked or broken main spring leaf or more than one broken spring leaf.
  3. part of spring leaf or suspension is missing, shifted out of place or is in contact with another vehicle component.
  4. loose U-bolt.
  5. broken spring on other than a leaf spring system.

Part 18. Tires

  1. damaged tread or sidewall of tire.
  2. tire leaking.
  1. flat tire.
  2. tire tread depth is less than wear limit.(11)
  3. tire is in contact with another tire or any vehicle component other than mud-flap.
  4. tire is marked "Not for highway use".
  5. tire has exposed cords in the tread or outer sidewall area

Part 19. Wheels, Hubs and Fasteners

  1. leaking wheel seal.
  1. visual or audible evidence of a loose, missing or ineffective fastener.
  2. damaged, cracked or broken wheel, rim or attaching part.
  3. evidence of imminent wheel, hub or bearing failure.

Part 20. Windshield Wiper / Washer

  1. control or system malfunction.
  2. wiper blade is damaged, missing or ineffective.
  3. wiper or washer fails to adequately clear the windshield in the areas swept by both wipers.

When use of wipers or washer is required:

  1. control or system malfunction.
  2. wiper is damaged, missing or ineffective.
  3. wiper or washer fails to adequately clear the windshield in the areas swept by both wipers.

Appendix B Sample Daily Inspection Reports

Sample 1 – Report: commercial motor vehicle that does not tow a trailer.

commercial motor vehicle that does not tow a trailer

Sample 2 – Report: commercial motor vehicle that tows only one trailer per day.

commercial motor vehicle that tows only one trailer per day

Sample 3 – Report: commercial motor vehicle that tows two trailers at different times.
Additional trailers may be added by duplicating the information for trailer 2.

commercial motor vehicle that tows two trailers at different times

Sample 4 – Report: commercial motor vehicle that tows two trailers at the same time.

commercial motor vehicle that tows two trailers at the same time.

Although not a requirement operators may choose to indicate if a defect is either major or minor.

defect is either major or minor

Sample 5 – Book Report: commercial motor vehicle that tows a trailer.

Book Report: commercial motor vehicle that tows a trailer

Sample 6 – Book Report: commercial motor vehicle that does not tow a trailer.

Book Report: commercial motor vehicle that tows a trailer

Sample 7 – Report Book: optional items for both types of report books

report-books

Sample 8 - Under-Vehicle Inspection Report

under-vehicle-inspection-report

Sample 9 – Certificate of Repairs

certificate-repairs
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